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GPs buried under trusts' workload dump

THE MAN'S DADDY

  • New GP contract to mandate practices to join primary care networks

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 08 Jan 2019 10:57am

    Reality: GPs leaving/retiring early. Surgeries closing down.

    Narrative: let's create "networks" (because we don't have enough staff and surgeries are closing down).

    A lot of this stuff is clearly government propaganda. They are clueless about how to deal with the healthcare crisis and have simply retrofitted a narrative to make it look it's part of a grand plan instead of desperation.

  • CQC has cleared the path for Government to invest in GP practices, says Steve Field

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 23 Oct 2018 2:38pm

    Read through the lines people.

    Essentially he is saying that the government thought that surgeries were badly run and below par, but the cqc proved this hypothesis incorrect.

    Like qof, the cqc should now therefore be retired and general practice should receive more funding via the global sum.

  • GP calls off recruitment attempts after introducing e-consultations

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 17 Oct 2018 1:39pm

    @neil bhatia

    As far as I'm aware askmygp is a telephone first system. So the gp rings up all patients for the day and tries to deal with the patient over the phone rather than face to face.

    From what I've looked up in the past, they have mixed outcomes. Reduction in workload depends on the surgery itself and the population it's serving.

  • Study: GPs 'should support' patients on meal-replacement weight-loss programmes

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 28 Sep 2018 3:58pm

    Great, at least now I understand your position which you are absolutely entitled to hold ( and you obviously don't need me to say that! :) ).

    My position is that if there is a cost benefit then this should be looked into further. I don't know if there is, but it should be studied further.

    My gut says that even if you treat lots of people it'll probably reduce the number of strokes/MIs/obesity related cancers etc, so will likely be cheaper than what we do now. I also feel (don't know for a fact) that this would probably be able to be done by less specialised healthcare professionals if rolled out.

    Off tangent: This conversation reminds of how certain countries don't offer needle exchange programmes to prevent HIV spreading. However it does reduce costs for society. There are a lot of second order effects however, such as in San Francisco where the streets are littered with used needles. So I agree the second order effects of widespread intervention is something that should be scrutinised and analysed.

    With regards to social Vs private etc. My perspective as a NHS doctor and someone who has dabbled in my fair share of business is that certain things need to have government regulation and ideally the regulations which are in place should be such that a thriving economy can be nurtured.

    I'm guessing we could talk at length about our differing perspectives but this probably isn't the forum for this.

  • Study: GPs 'should support' patients on meal-replacement weight-loss programmes

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 28 Sep 2018 3:16pm

    @christopher ho

    You still haven't addressed either one of the points.

    1) are you saying you draw the line at diet supplements because you view this as socialized medicine?

    That's fine if that's the case, but we are working in a socialised system where of course this route of treatment will garner interest.

    2) are you saying that this will increase costs?

    Where is the data for this claim? Isn't this why further studies / trials should be done?

    What would your position be if further studies demonstrated a cost benefit?

    Just as an aside- no one can force patients to do anything. No one is advocating treating patients like children. No one is saying that patients should be forced to have treatments that they don't want.

  • Study: GPs 'should support' patients on meal-replacement weight-loss programmes

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 28 Sep 2018 1:31pm

    Keep up the straw man arguments people!

    Instead of dealing with points such as;

    1) why is a diet which is safer and more effective than drugs available the line we should draw in helping patients.

    2) Why shouldn't the NHS help people who will create a greater burden on society by not helping them (again, in which case why do ANY preventative treatments).

    Really makes us GPs look great as a profession when we don't learn and move forward with new data which should be looked into further...

  • Study: GPs 'should support' patients on meal-replacement weight-loss programmes

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 27 Sep 2018 9:04pm

    @northwestdoc
    @sandra teare

    It's rather unusual why this study is making headlines now. I first came across the findings last winter in the bmj.

    Full findings here: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)33102-1/fulltext

    It is a preliminary study, however as I mentioned before if this was an actual drug with the main side effect being a tad bit of constipation then it would already have millions pounds worth of funding and on going trials.

    Ps, no I'm not in any way affiliated with this study. I'm just a regular coal face GP partner.

  • Study: GPs 'should support' patients on meal-replacement weight-loss programmes

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 27 Sep 2018 2:58pm

    @pradeep

    Diabetic nurses can't take clinical responsibility for novel approaches, that's why doctors exist and everything isn't nurse led.

    My point is that we should be fighting for resources that can help the patient.

    We are under resourced at the moment but we should be fighting for more.

    The cost you point out for diet replacement meals is negligible compared to the long term costs of diabetes/obesity and complications such as IHD and stroke.

    In other words you're being short sighted and not thinking.

    @christopher ho

    The health budget will get even worse if obesity and all of its associated health conditions aren't tackled. So your argument is already a non starter.

    Also, you as a GP are already helping patients who have made poor lifestyle choices by giving them antihypertensives, providing antidiabetic agents, referring to dieticians, referring for gastric operations etc.

    So WHY have you drawn the line at providing dietary supplements etc. Why have you decided that this is precisely where we should draw the line in providing care?

    We're in the game of providing healthcare. If you think there's a socialist agenda or something by providing proven care to our patients then perhaps you should reconsider your profession.

  • Study: GPs 'should support' patients on meal-replacement weight-loss programmes

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 27 Sep 2018 1:10pm

    @the four lunatics who have already posted above be.

    What are you talking about? If ANY anti diabetic drug had as good of an outcome as meal replacements it would be mandatory to prescribe and use it.

    If ANY drug had as much benefit with is few side effects then it would be touted as a wonder cure and there would be plenty of funding for it.

    This is exactly the type of thing that should be supported in primary care and I'm surprised at my colleagues attitudes / responses.

  • Babylon app ‘takes pressure off’ GPs to help all patients, says health secretary

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 17 Sep 2018 0:41am

    It'll take the pressure off of GPs because they'll all leave the NHS and go work somewhere else! :D

  • Babylon pledges £75m to develop AI for managing chronic conditions

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 14 Sep 2018 12:21pm

    Artificial intelligence? Is that something that's pretending to be intelligent? :D

  • Digital provider to offer video consultation software to GP practices for free

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 28 Aug 2018 2:08pm

    Just as I have been saying.

    Video over the internet is not "new technology" - it will be treated as a commodity more and more as time passes, with more and more providers in the market place.

    A race to the bottom for providers but a more open market place for GPs.

  • Babylon suffers continued block on plans to expand GP at Hand to Birmingham

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 15 Aug 2018 5:27pm

    Tony, then we agree.

    You came across as indifferent to the current state of affairs, thus the accusation by another poster that you actually work for Babylon.

  • Babylon suffers continued block on plans to expand GP at Hand to Birmingham

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 15 Aug 2018 4:43pm

    Tony,

    I am glad you have clarified your position; that you don't mind private providers winning contracts and skimming off profits for themselves.

    Many of your colleagues do not share the same view point as you, thus the outrage.

    All the best.

  • Babylon suffers continued block on plans to expand GP at Hand to Birmingham

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 15 Aug 2018 4:15pm

    Tony, yes we disagree.

    However, I'm guessing that you would find it odd that if your telephone provider ended up taking over your GMS contract.

    Providing a way to see patients via video link is no different. Where is the flaw in my logic here?

  • Babylon suffers continued block on plans to expand GP at Hand to Birmingham

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 15 Aug 2018 3:54pm

    Tony, it is not like virgin health.

    Video via the internet should be treated as a commodity just like telephone lines are.

    It should not be a means to gain access to gain access to GMS funding.

  • Babylon suffers continued block on plans to expand GP at Hand to Birmingham

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 15 Aug 2018 3:38pm

    Tony, no one is disputing that video consultations / telephone consultations have their place.

    People are concerned the way a private provider is forcing its way into the resources of a public institution.

    There is not a fundamental difference between telephone consultations and video consultations in my estimation. Therefore the way Babylon is behaving seems abhorrent - it is the same as if BT positioned itself as a "medical phone provider" and started to get funded via a GMS contract by providing telephone consultations with a GP.

  • GP training rota has turned me into a dinosaur

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 25 Mar 2017 11:05pm

    I'm an ST3.

    The current system gave me enough time to see enough patients to pass my exams.

    As for not being prepared for "what the actual job is like", I am reminded of a quote by Marcus Aurelius: "Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present."

    Don't worry about my future, I can accept responsibility for it.

  • Initial figures indicate vast improvement in GP trainee recruitment

    THE MAN'S DADDY's comment 08 Jul 2016 10:40am

    My insight as a GP registrar is that a lot of people apply to GP training as a "backup". A lot of these applicants are likely to be two minded about entering into the actual scheme. To applicants it probably seems quite reasonable to apply and wait to see how the junior doctors contract issue resolves before committing to training as a GP.