This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

140 years ago: Notes and Queries

The Editors, being desirous of making this department a useful medium of communication between practitioners, will be glad to receive short notes on theoretical or practical points in therapeutics.

The Editors, being desirous of making this department a useful medium of communication between practitioners, will be glad to receive short notes on theoretical or practical points in therapeutics.

Introduction

The Editors, being desirous of making this department a useful medium of communication between practitioners, will be glad to receive short notes on theoretical or practical points in therapeutics, brief jottings on those numerous queries which suggest themselves from time to time to a medical man as he "goes his rounds," but which he has neither the time nor, in some cases, the opportunity of answering. The Editors do not pledge themselves to reply to every question addressed to them, but they hope to make the "department" the means of supplying the information required, and this they can only effect by the hearty assistance of their readers.

Cannabis Indicae in Senile Catarrh

Dr. J. Curran Waring writes to us to say that he has found cannabis an invaluable remedy in catarrhus senilis. He administers it in ten-minim doses gradually increased, and suspended in mucilage. Its effects, he says, must be seen to be thoroughly realized. He believes that as an anodyne it is immensely superior to every other drug.

The Varieties of Local Anaesthesia by Ether Spray

A "Correspondent", makes the following remarks:– "In using Richardson's apparatus I find that the result of the ether atomization is by no means constant. The anaesthesia is produced in one of two forms, which is dependent for its production on some condition of the atmosphere (possibly hygrometric) which I have not yet discovered. This is what I mean:– Sometimes the effect of the spray (which I chiefly employ before using the hypodermic syringe) is to produce a thick layer of ice, which destroys the sensibility of the skin without producing any other noticeable change. At other times after a few whiffs, the skin suddenly blanches (as rapidly as a flash of lightning), but no ice is produced. In this case the skin is like a piece of hard, white, rough pasteboard. In the former case it is as soft, or nearly so, as usual. In the first case no harm is done to the skin. But in the second, the part frozen is found sore and very irritable for a couple of days. Can any of your readers suggest a means by which the first form may be always obtained? I fancy I always get the ice-anaesthesia in moist, damp weather, when the air is charged with vapour. Do you think, then, that if I were to use a double bottle and nozzle, and to eject water and ether-vapour simultaneous on the part, I should achieve this most desirable consummation?"

Alcohol in Phlegmasiae

M. Gubler, writing in the Bulletin de Thérapeutique, criticises the opinions of Todd, Anstie, Brinton, Béhier, Stokes, Salter, and makes the following observations:– Alcohol must not be given indiscriminately in all forms. Alcohol is injurious in acute intense inflammatory fever, in which the pulse is quick and the temperature high, in which there is an excess of respiratory (!) combustion, and abundance of urea and products of denutrition in the urine. In such a case the patient desires to be cool, and objects to wine and food, and the physician should obey the natural instinct displayed. But in those cases in which an opposite set of conditions exists, in which the urine contains little urea, much uric acid and fatty matter and albuminous substances, alcohol is most valuable in giving assistance to the latent forces, or in absolutely yielding force to the exhausted nervous system.

Subcutaneous Injection of Morphia in Asthma

Professor Hirtz has lately had some cases of asthma (essential) in which the subcutaneous injection of morphia produced the most marvellous results. He admits that it has not cured the disease; but he asks whether, by repeatedly preventing the attacks by the employment of morphia hypodermically, he may not do much to remove what he calls the tendency to the affection.

Animal Diet in Psoriasis

In reference to an abstract of M. Passavant's views on this subject, Dr. J. Owen Evans writes to us to offer his own personal experience of the disease and its treatment. Although he places most reliance on arsenic, he states that in his own case he has found lamentable consequences ensue from indulgence in vegetable diet, and the happiest results from a regimen of nearly purely animal food. As, however, he has never tried the animal diet unaccompanied by arsenic, he is unable to express a definitive opinion.

Rate this article 

Click to rate

  • 1 star out of 5
  • 2 stars out of 5
  • 3 stars out of 5
  • 4 stars out of 5
  • 5 stars out of 5

0 out of 5 stars

Have your say