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Vinci Ho

Vinci Ho

  • GPs have ‘chosen’ ten-minute consultations, claims NHS England lead

    Vinci Ho's comment 21 Oct 2017 1:30pm

    You see
    Never look back after labelling NHSE as Ministry of Plenty ( and the rest).
    Recently on this platform, we seem to have some sympathisers(including one of our respectable, young , female columnists) commenting that people actually working very hard in NSHE to improve NHS and general practice which I could understand.
    Problem is always coming from the leaders instead. Well ,this public statement from NHSE is phenomenal and perhaps should remind sympathisers the need of eyes wide open.
    An enemy is an enemy, remains an enemy.....

  • GPs have ‘chosen’ ten-minute consultations, claims NHS England lead

    Vinci Ho's comment 21 Oct 2017 11:29am

    Correction
    .....triumphants....

  • GPs have ‘chosen’ ten-minute consultations, claims NHS England lead

    Vinci Ho's comment 21 Oct 2017 11:27am

    For the record, it is essential to have the correct writings on the wall. I advise more colleagues speak out on this.

    Today's news is tomorrow's history. Repeatedly,we have seen history being twisted and betrayed by those trumiumphants in games of power . And their subordinates are never tired in uploading more lies and ideologies.
    What is the truth and reality? At least , it is not like what they described as the cause(s) of a failing system , diverting responsibilities to those working very hard in the frontline to ,at least ,keep the system sustaining.
    Those who talked about controversy are the persons of controversy. And they are the ones who have been hypnotising our conscience and as a result, we cannot look at the conscience of the world.
    Just looked the calendar this morning and realised that history has almost passed 100 years from the Red October Revolution of Russia in October 1917(November by western calendar). That was one of the hallmarks (alongside with the First World War) which set the beginning of an eventful 20th century with vigorous and ideological upheavals where so many innocent lives were disadvantaged and perished meaninglessly. Of course , there is a spilling over to this day in 21st century............

  • GPs have ‘chosen’ ten-minute consultations, claims NHS England lead

    Vinci Ho's comment 20 Oct 2017 8:43pm

    And I have not said this for a long while:
    Please go home to look into the mirror and check if one's reflection is still there ..........

  • GPs have ‘chosen’ ten-minute consultations, claims NHS England lead

    Vinci Ho's comment 20 Oct 2017 8:36pm

    Dr Varnam said: ‘I think we have chosen to work in ten-minute appointment slots when some people could be dealt with in five, and others couldn’t be dealt with in under 20.'

    Mmmmmm
    Is he one of 'we' ? How many of you folks would agree to this categorisation.
    I tell you what is we ? We are the ones being oppressed by NHSE , those cynical commissioners and national media(you all know which one anyway).
    So , logically , is it 'unethical' for the oppressor(s) calling themselves 'we' , the ones being oppressed ?

  • GPs have ‘chosen’ ten-minute consultations, claims NHS England lead

    Vinci Ho's comment 20 Oct 2017 8:07pm

    Ha ha ha
    As soon as I said NHSE could not afford to be so arrogant as like before the last general election, somebody wanted to prove me wrong. I slapped my face for this .
    There is a Chinese saying,' it is easy to change the mountain and river but the fundamental personalities of people can never be changed.'
    江山易改,本性難移

  • Chief GP inspector admits practices have received unfair CQC ratings

    Vinci Ho's comment 19 Oct 2017 5:07pm

    ‘I put my hands up and say we’re not as consistent as we should be but we try very, very hard and I’m pretty confident about inadequate. I don’t think we’ve rated enough surgeries as outstanding actually.’

    Mmmmm, CQC intelligence is as good as this:
    Tony Blair and George W Bush + intelligence on WMD= War in Iraq.
    Well ,much damages were done but no problem, Saddam Hussein is dead now.

  • NHS England hails returner scheme for 400 GPs coming back to practise

    Vinci Ho's comment 19 Oct 2017 2:52pm

    I still think the politician climate changes matter. Considering the level of arrogance of NHSE on its earlier days , coalition and Cameron's governments, there was no surprise that it wanted to do absolutely f*** all to save general practice. But that was then , it is now . What goes around, what comes around. This current PM had to succumb to pressure from strong oppositions coming from all directions. Scrapping the phone charges on Universal Benefit helpline is phenomenal. NHSE cannot say it has nothing to do with what is going on in this GP crisis.
    I always believe those who do harm on others will have their penance (Hunt's favourite word!)ultimately, just a matter of time........

  • NHS England hails returner scheme for 400 GPs coming back to practise

    Vinci Ho's comment 19 Oct 2017 10:03am

    So, what is the lesson learnt? (For NHSE as well as politicians)
    From 1 out of 108 in 2015 to now 400 GPs got through , what have been done differently.
    Is this enough evidence to claim that 5YGPFV actually had made the profession more attractive?
    One can say if there is a political will , there is a political way . But how vigorous was and is this polical will ??

  • MDU's 'half price indemnity' offer will leave GPs liable to future costs, warns DH

    Vinci Ho's comment 18 Oct 2017 12:34pm

    Too good to be true.
    Every action is supported by a motive , whether we are talking about the health secretary or the MDU etc.
    Do not let them blind you with politics.
    Stay put . Time will tell.

  • RCGP launches overseas GP guide to life in the UK

    Vinci Ho's comment 17 Oct 2017 8:21pm

    This chapter is called 'Nationality' in the guide worth reading, especially the uncertainty of Brexit remains:

    Doctors who are EEA nationals, from Switzerland, or have EC rights

    If you are an EEA national, you are free to come to the UK to work. You don't need a visa, or a job offer, or to be earning a particular salary. You can also bring your family members to the UK with you. You must, however, have the necessary knowledge of English before being granted a licence by the GMC, and may need to take a test. You will have to do some form of induction and training.

    There is no limit on how long you can stay in the UK – it will depend on the contract of employment. However, once an EEA national has been in the UK for five years, they and their family members can claim permanent residence providing they have been working or self-employed for those five years. The BMA has information on claiming permanent residence for EEA nationals.

    Croatian nationals need to seek specific permission to work in the UK. Further details are available from the Croatian nationals page of GOV.UK.

    Registration and licensing

    If you graduated from a medical school in the EEA or Switzerland and completed a medical internship, you may be able to use this qualification to apply for full registration. The GMC website provides a list of the specific documents that you need to provide, depending on their country and date of qualification.

    GP registration

    Doctors who attained a GP qualification in the EEA or Switzerland which is listed in The Directive on Recognition of Professional Qualifications for the country in which they obtained the qualification are entitled to mutual recognition of that qualification.

    Doctors who attained a GP qualification in the EEA or Switzerland which is not listed in The Directive on Recognition of Professional Qualifications for the country in which they obtained the qualification are entitled to an assessment of their qualification under the general system. This will compare the training they have undertaken to the UK GP curriculum. Doctors in this position should read the guidance for Certificate of Eligibility for GP Registration (CEGPR) applicants.

    Read about Dr Maria Drakou's move from Greece to England (PDF)
    Doctors from outside the EEA

    If you are a non-EEA national, you will need a job offer and a visa to work in the UK. A Tier 2 (General) visa is required and there are several rules you need to meet. More information can be found on the GOV UK and BMA websites.

    If you are from outside the EEA, you may have specific rights to live and work in the UK, if you are the spouse of an EEA national, or because you have commonwealth ancestry rights. If you think this may apply to you, please check the GOV.UK website.

    Immigration and visas

    Immigration and visa rules change dramatically and frequently and the current system is extremely complex. For overseas doctors working and training in the UK who are subject to the immigration rules, how visa rules are applied can be disruptive.

    BMA members can access a free Immigration advice service which provides basic immigration advice in connection with your employment and study in the UK.

    You can stay up to date by signing up to the BMA's free visa alerts service

    Registration and licensing

    If you do not hold a UK primary medical qualification, there are three ways you can obtain full registration with a licence to practise:

    Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB)
    Sponsorship
    Certificate of Eligibility for GP Registration (CEGPR)
    These assess whether you have the required knowledge and skills to practise medicine safely. Whichever route is followed, you must hold an acceptable primary medical qualification.

    To obtain a GMC licence to practise, doctors from outside the EEA must prove that they have the necessary knowledge of English to communicate effectively so that the safety of patients is not put at risk. This includes speaking, reading, writing and listening.

    There are several ways that doctors from outside the EEA can demonstrate they have the necessary knowledge of English, including achieving the required scores in the International English Testing System (IELTS). More information can be found on the GMC website.

    GP registration

    Doctors who have either a postgraduate qualification in general practice, or a minimum of six months GP training – undertaken anywhere in the world – can apply for a Certificate of Eligibility for GP Registration (CEGPR). The GMC does not automatically recognise any GP qualifications attained outside of the EEA, although evidence of GP training undertaken overseas can be useful supporting evidence for CEGPR applications. Similarly, RCGP accredited international membership assessments leading to MRCGP [INT] are unique to each of the nine countries where international members have qualified. As such, MRCGP [INT] is not automatically deemed equivalent to UK MRCGP, but can be used to support a CEGPR application.

    Once you have gained a CEGPR you are automatically included in the GP Register.

    Certification of Eligibility for GP Registration (CEGPR) applications

    A CEGPR application can be made by doctors who feel that their knowledge, skills and experience are equivalent to the standards required by the current approved curriculum for UK general practice.

    Applicants will need to provide verified documentary evidence showing how they have achieved all the competencies required by the current GP curriculum. They will be asked to provide referees who can comment on their recent practise and skills, and will also need to submit 'primary evidence' of their work, such as patient logs and case studies. As a general guide, most applicants submit around 500-800 pages of evidence. It can take around six months for your application to be considered from the point of application.

    The RCGP and GMC have produced detailed guidance on the evidence a doctor should submit in support of their CEGPR application.

    If you would like to gain MRCGP once you have a CEPGR, you will also need to complete Membership by Assessment of Performance (MAP).

    Read about Antony's move from Australia to London (PDF) and Dr Charlotte Cant's move from Alaska to Scotland (PDF). Dr Cant has written also provided some top tips on applying for a CEGPR (PDF).

  • GPs to take control of prescribing budgets and keep half of any savings

    Vinci Ho's comment 17 Oct 2017 7:04pm

    less than 0.0001 , for instance

  • GPs to take control of prescribing budgets and keep half of any savings

    Vinci Ho's comment 17 Oct 2017 7:03pm

    p-value

  • GPs to take control of prescribing budgets and keep half of any savings

    Vinci Ho's comment 17 Oct 2017 6:57pm

    On another angle , it begs serious question why and how drug companies justified the expensive price tags on certain medications, particularly those widely used . Mebeverine liquid is one and we all learnt the story of phenytoin last year . Tale of Pregabalin/Lyrica has become a black comedy as the drug is approaching controlled status.
    All in all , government(s) were helpless in stamping pressure on these big companies to stop exploitation. Do not want sound too left wing but clearly there are no checks and balances .
    Every tree has its bad apples but the phenomenon we had witnessed through recent history, suggested there were clearly flaws in how new drugs were passed and licensed for widespread usages. Remember the stories of Rofecoxib, Rosiglitazone and perhaps Sibutramine?
    Personally, always sceptical about studies supporting null hypothesis with p-values as low as

  • #GPnews: NHS England 'sincerely apologises' for claiming Pulse story was false

    Vinci Ho's comment 16 Oct 2017 2:00pm

    The tactics had already worked by denying it first and then apologising later . At least , the denial had gone out in public . The analogy is for tabloids fabricating a story and paid compensations later after being sued by those victimised . Damage is done , most importantly.
    On the other angle , incompetence is worse than maleficence as far as NHSE is concerned. But then again , if this government was not a minority one , NHSE's arrogance will simply prevail and you will not get any apology, what so ever .

  • Four unanswered questions on the GP indemnity scheme

    Vinci Ho's comment 13 Oct 2017 9:17pm

    For those of us who are familiar of DoH documents and publications (LMC members, for instance) , the choice of words are always careful with even encryption sometimes.
    Read this document through , you might find more questions than answers:
    (1) 'State-backed' is clearly not crown , the word we preferred instead. My preliminary understanding is that we will still have to pay a fee from our pocket but the amount as well as any future increase , is under the scrutiny of the government. Then again , 12-18 months before the state can accomplish this 'backing' is rather mysterious.
    The practical question is , 'does DoH have an estimation of how much money is actually involved?'
    (2) My gut feeling sensed something strange when MDU announced a 50% reduction of current subscription fee almost simultaneously when the health secretary made his announcement. Call me a conspiracy theorist . Clearly, there is some variation in terms of how much different medical defence organisations have been charging their members . Also , more than half of our subscriptions to MDOs are for covering litigation related issues. So if this stated-backed indemnity is solely litigation related , one can probably work out how much we should pay for the coverage of non-litigation processes.
    (3) This announcement cannot stop one from drawing implications from the overall political big picture. The Chancellor got himself caught in lines of fire as far as his party's civil war is concerned. Deep down , he is refusing to put billions of domestic money(for health and education) aside for a possible 'no deal' outcome of Brexit negotiations with EU. But he is under intense pressure from some backbenchers to do so. Hence , I am not 100% convinced about this scheme without a statement from the treasury office. If this is a new money , one should expect some mentioning in the next Chancellor's budget announcement.
    (4) Based on the original argument that high indemnity fee is one big obstacle that is hindering recruitment and retention, particularly in out of hours , the impact of this scheme has to be positive to deem itself as one solution to our crisis.
    Clearly , 12-18 months will take the time up to late 2019 , how can one ensure this scheme can help the government reaching the target of 5000 more GPs by 2020. We need to see this money now.
    Well ,one thing is for sure , the time will have passed the deadline of Brexit on 31/3/2019. If you are a strong believer of Boris , there will be £350 million more per week for NHS .
    (5) Only GPs in England can benefit so far , why? The typical technocratic answer in the document was that it would be down to individual devolved administration in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland . Aren't we talking about a crisis for all UK GPs?

    The rumour was the prime minister would have a cabinet reshuffle soon . I am afraid once again ,one day of politics is too long .
    Watch the space , folks .

  • DH now says indemnity scheme will cover all practice staff

    Vinci Ho's comment 13 Oct 2017 9:16pm

    For those of us who are familiar of DoH documents and publications (LMC members, for instance) , the choice of words are always careful with even encryption sometimes.
    Read this document through , you might find more questions than answers:
    (1) 'State-backed' is clearly not crown , the word we preferred instead. My preliminary understanding is that we will still have to pay a fee from our pocket but the amount as well as any future increase , is under the scrutiny of the government. Then again , 12-18 months before the state can accomplish this 'backing' is rather mysterious.
    The practical question is , 'does DoH have an estimation of how much money is actually involved?'
    (2) My gut feeling sensed something strange when MDU announced a 50% reduction of current subscription fee almost simultaneously when the health secretary made his announcement. Call me a conspiracy theorist . Clearly, there is some variation in terms of how much different medical defence organisations have been charging their members . Also , more than half of our subscriptions to MDOs are for covering litigation related issues. So if this stated-backed indemnity is solely litigation related , one can probably work out how much we should pay for the coverage of non-litigation processes.
    (3) This announcement cannot stop one from drawing implications from the overall political big picture. The Chancellor got himself caught in lines of fire as far as his party's civil war is concerned. Deep down , he is refusing to put billions of domestic money(for health and education) aside for a possible 'no deal' outcome of Brexit negotiations with EU. But he is under intense pressure from some backbenchers to do so. Hence , I am not 100% convinced about this scheme without a statement from the treasury office. If this is a new money , one should expect some mentioning in the next Chancellor's budget announcement.
    (4) Based on the original argument that high indemnity fee is one big obstacle that is hindering recruitment and retention, particularly in out of hours , the impact of this scheme has to be positive to deem itself as one solution to our crisis.
    Clearly , 12-18 months will take the time up to late 2019 , how can one ensure this scheme can help the government reaching the target of 5000 more GPs by 2020. We need to see this money now.
    Well ,one thing is for sure , the time will have passed the deadline of Brexit on 31/3/2019. If you are a strong believer of Boris , there will be £350 million more per week for NHS .
    (5) Only GPs in England can benefit so far , why? The typical technocratic answer in the document was that it would be down to individual devolved administration in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland . Aren't we talking about a crisis for all UK GPs?

    The rumour was the prime minister would have a cabinet reshuffle soon . I am afraid once again ,one day of politics is too long .
    Watch the space , folks .

  • Patients 'want to see GP over other health professionals'

    Vinci Ho's comment 13 Oct 2017 1:42pm

    You see
    'I want to see my specialist now' does not represent the sentiment of the majority in this country, at least. It also reflects the history and culture of the country. NHS has become a religion whether one likes it or not . We are the gatekeeper of NHS . Hence , trying to send us to extinction or replace us with someone or something else is accordingly(by this assumption) a form of paganism.

  • Revealed: NHS's plans to bar patients from attending A&E without a referral

    Vinci Ho's comment 13 Oct 2017 12:34pm

    Perhaps there is something we can never change:
    ''It can only be what it is, not what you want it to be.''
    Burnham
    Star Trek Discovery

  • Revealed: NHS's plans to bar patients from attending A&E without a referral

    Vinci Ho's comment 13 Oct 2017 12:15pm

    There is a bare minimum of resources to meet a certain level of demands (yes, argument still on needs versus demands).
    All I know is even patients have to be charged for attending A/E in public hospitals in Hong Kong , they are still running at a subscription of over 100% of the capacity (at worst 120%) last year.