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Gold, incentives and meh

Peter Brigg

  • Can I refuse to treat a dental abscess?

    Peter Brigg's comment 30 Jan 2017 9:59pm

    ps. it IS a lightbulb and not a rewire, that would be dental implants

  • Can I refuse to treat a dental abscess?

    Peter Brigg's comment 30 Jan 2017 9:36pm

    unbelievably lame , but predictable responses!
    are you seriously telling me that if you were stuck on a desert island with bad toothache and a swollen jaw, but also happened to have a supply of suitable antibiotics and analgesia, you would not know what to do??!
    treating a dental abscess/infection is no different from any other infection. go back to basic principles.
    the 4 years of dental training are mainly spent on learning to do fillings bridges and restorative dentistry ,and orthodontics etc.(something i would not attempt)
    they also spend time learning a bit of medecine, ent and preventive health care.
    most would do a pretty good job of CPR.
    I could go on (and on), but its time some of us Drs took a hard look in the mirror and asked themselves if they are trying to help the patient or themselves...

  • Can I refuse to treat a dental abscess?

    Peter Brigg's comment 29 Jan 2017 9:37am

    putting aside the exactly correct way to treat a simple problem this old chestnut instantly weeds out who should never have been a Dr.
    lets just change the question shall we?
    "An old lady or neighbour asks you to help her change her lightbulb as she is worried about climbing on a stool"
    do we say "f-off' I'm a highly qualified Doctor, i'm far too busy and important to do a simple task like that! call an electrician..." or hide behind some other lame elf and safety excuse annd decline.
    Anyone who has ever suffered with toothache knows how painful this can be, you should obviously use this opportunity to hammer home some helpful advice about brushing teeth and not eating sweets before explaining you are incapable of helping them.
    Special (educated) people like Doctors should have their own secret stash of antibiotics and tramadol for this sort of problem.
    (in case you just just dont care or your thought process is too algorythmically wired and inflexible to notice the correct answer,if you are kind and caring is obvious...)

  • More than a quarter of GPs work beyond safe hours every week

    Peter Brigg's comment 23 Jan 2017 8:25am

    "Luxury! in ma day wi worked 9 days a wik and 'ad t' lick rord before wi went t'bed" etc. etc
    thankyou dr unknown, my experience mirrors yours. working a "23umt" housejob etc. was standard, and quite exhausting at times. the fact is we rarely complained because we all enjoyed it so much. the experience gained was unique, unforgetable, and sometimes emotionally draining. we were doing a job we had signed up for, EVERYBODY knew Drs worked long hours,EVERYBODY knew we weren't, paid a fortune but they still envied us, we ALL knew this when we applied for medecine and were immensly proud to be the 1/20 applicants to get a place. When we did get days off, we certainly didnt go straight to bed!

    The tone of all these Dr anonymous letters simply proves that the less hours you work, the more you start to hate yor job as it is no longer "what you do". Working now takes you away from the exciting reality of travelling, going out with friends and "familly life".ie doing "what normal people do"
    These weren't the golden years by any means, i'm not condoning slave labour but the growing mentality of institutionalised "feeling hard done by" needs to be addressed.do a little tiny bit of research out of your self obsessed bubbles and discover how hard everybody else works, mostly for less. some for more (even much more). (face book is a good place to start...)
    I personally wouldnt want to swap.
    beware of the curse:-
    "may you find what you are looking for..."

  • 'Paying GPs less will not increase numbers'

    Peter Brigg's comment 14 Jan 2017 8:15am

    the clue to solving recruitment of gps is in the description of all these enthusiastic starry eyed nice young Drs working to save the world , the ccg, and the NHS, instead of following their vocation and doing what they were trained to do.

  • All GPs must help patients obtain firearms licences if requested, BMA says

    Peter Brigg's comment 17 Nov 2016 6:01pm

    oh boo hoo! Drs are actually been asked to be brave and make a descision, in the public interest.WHAT IS YOUR PROBLEM?!
    here we are as trusted and respected public servants being asked to help out fellow public servants, who actually wear body armour to protect themselves from psychopaths and the rest of the mostly sane but criminal underclass,in order to protect the rest of us.
    we earn more in a day than most police earn in a week.
    i am not particularly interested in the perverse thinking on anti hunt/gun/toff champagne socialists that seem to be inflicting politics and political correctness on medical professionals. this sort of information is a public duty to provide in the interests of public protection and we for our sins are better placed than anyone else to provide it.
    if you know a patient with a gun would be a threat to the public then you would clearly be negligent if you did not say so. fee or no fee.
    what goes around comes around. refuse/ obstruct or protest, and you shoot yourself in the foot...

  • GPs suffer email issues after NHS worker accidentally messages everyone

    Peter Brigg's comment 16 Nov 2016 10:44pm

    dear roland
    i dont really care about all you other rodents that lie around in nests,lined with newspaper, email memos,or whatever, or even hibernate when it gets busy in the winter.
    its only us hamsters that are stuck on the treadmill...

  • Do we need more men in general practice?

    Peter Brigg's comment 12 Nov 2016 10:06am

    well said j smidt! excuse me for mixing my metaphors, but i feel you need to "grow some". we must stop pussy-footing around these issues and call a spade a spade.
    just read the artcle on making denigration of general practice an offence , which can be whistleblown to the GMC, far easier to include such statements as "sexist" and bobs your uncle, we can get the mysogenist old codgers struck off...

  • Junior doctors to take five-day continuous strike action

    Peter Brigg's comment 02 Sep 2016 11:51pm

    i will say it again, a place at medical school is not a prize you get for being top of the class at school. it is a vocation that most who want to do it, would make sacrifices to do.
    it is clearly disingenuous to suggest that this proposed strike is really about saving the nhs. it is politically motivated. and about maximising pay.
    when reading the comments in this "Comments" section; the bullying tactics, language and tyrrany of the (dwindling) "majority" who vote for a strike is worrying when we consider that these people will be future Drs.reqired to be impartial and caring with no bias based on belief or political predjudice.
    there is nothing clever about demonising mr hunt,(clearly a decent and honest human being) with pathetic insults and "rhyming slang". shame on you, show some respect and professional curteousy if you want to be heard. there are two sides to every problem.
    stop hiding behind anonymous curtains if you want any credibility.
    the fact is, there are a lot of very capable people who can and would do your jobs just as well, for less money. they would relish the hard work and long hours, care more and show greater humility. they might have fewer A*s at A level but this is unimportant.
    forget " Who dares, Wins"
    think more:- (he) "who cares (who) ; wins..."

  • Medicine degrees offered through clearing 'for first time ever'

    Peter Brigg's comment 18 Aug 2016 9:50pm

    need to stop thinking it takes 5a* to do medecine,
    all it needs is people who care, with appetite for hard work,and reasonable problem solving skills, ie any car mechanic or cid detective could be a very good dr, as long as they cared about people and had empathy and ability to care, and be humble.
    ie Deans please note, OCD workaholics on "the spectrum" and intelligent hedonists obsessed with "work life balance", hellbent on travel to the southern hemisphere need not apply.
    back in the day if you were the right person forthe job , 3C's or better was enough.
    i am not condoning working 8 days a week, but if you want to be a Dr. you cannot complain about the hard work.
    it is, or was a vocation, not a prize for being top of the class.
    the pay was,is and always will be not bad, you will never go hungry.
    it was (?still is) respected and trusted. something money cant buy.
    bring on more clearing, those who get in via this route will be grateful for the place and probably honored to be a Dr, rather than arogant entitled hedonists.
    get over yourselves.
    nearly everybody works very long hours,
    try asking a single mum how they feel about long hours without pay.
    Ps the patient is Not the enemy!

  • Why I refuse to leave my maiden name at the altar

    Peter Brigg's comment 18 Aug 2016 10:19am

    in my experience people who try to reinvent the wheel end up making squares or pigs ears.
    evolution, like revolution is generally likely to produce the best result, and the british/ christian naming system is oneof them, change the system at your peril...

  • Hunt 'very much hopes' to stay on as health secretary under new PM

    Peter Brigg's comment 14 Jul 2016 10:35pm

    i am happy to congratulate him on the fact that the pm is happy to leave him with the ultimate poisonous pill.
    I will state that as a profession we let ourselves down with the way anonymous members shame us all with their potty-mouthed posts.
    i may or maynot agree with his vision on the future of the nhs, but i will state that he is a decent and honest human, i expect his mother loves him, and if you met him anonymously, most of us would probably find him good company; political difference is never an excuse for rude, insulting and frankly slanderous posts.

  • General practice's gender problem

    Peter Brigg's comment 14 Jul 2016 12:48pm

    it seems to me that there is far more than just gender differences going on here. It is combined with a view that the "majority" of new medical graduates seem to have that "part time work" and flexible working is the norm, ie we are working to live, rather than living for our work.
    I fully understand that women on the whole will have career breaks and work part time when raising a family.I always imagined that if medicine was a vocation, they would at some point return to full time work, but this is clearly not happening.
    It is equally clear now that a very significant number also now work part time long before starting a family and have no intention of working more than part time.
    combined with the need to go on "working gap years" for several years after qualifying in some form of hedonistic frenzy after all the hard work of obtaining 5A** at a level and qualifying at medical school for the chosen rotation etc. and we start to see the problem developing.
    we need to see a return to medical selection of truely vocational students who to some extent understand the trade off that doing a popular career choice has . ie strong commitment to the job, even when it involves unsocial hours and long hours.
    bright pupils with 3 good a level grades A-C and lots of other qualities and interests(sport/music/drama etc) is what will keep future GPs sane , NOT 5 Astars. Hard work is only stressful if you don't really enjoy it....

  • In support of our striking junior colleagues

    Peter Brigg's comment 18 May 2016 11:45pm

    much as i support the need for better pay and conditions for the whole medical profession it just does not justify a strike. blaming the current govt. for problems in a heavily politicised NHS(a legacy of the last 3-4 governments) fails to see the problems caused by recruiting Drs on mainly academic rather than vocational credentials. as one of the latter group with low gades at A level (by todays standards) rather like schooldays, we enjoyed the long hours at work, and even though underpaid,we were honored by therespect and trust we were given. a strike was then and still is out of the question to me. it has only served the purposes of the politically motivated BMA intent on using naive idealist junior Drs to give the govt a bloody nose. the good thing about medical school in my day was that your political. orientation was irrelavant and never seriously discussed.junior drs are mistaking support from some sectors of the pulic (against the government as support for the strike which in due course wont be forgotten or forgiven.

  • Hunt set to impose contract on junior doctors after BMA rejects 'final offer'

    Peter Brigg's comment 11 Feb 2016 11:57pm

    i have posted this elsewhere. sorry to repeat it but needs saying.

    Lions led by donkeys"
    is the phrase that springs to mind here.

    BMA is sadly like so many large organisations of medically qualified people with the honorary title of "Dr", becoming intoxicated with its self perceived illusion that it represents the voice of the profession, ignoring as it does the silent majority or significant minority.

    idealogical and politically motivated obsession with taking on the evil tories has caused them to send the naive and idealist junior Drs into a battle with the government which they cannot win and will irreperably damage the reputation of the whole profession.

    there are many things wrong with Drs pay and conditions, but poverty and financial exploitation are not one of them, and striking has been totally unnescessary unless you are purely hellbent on damaging the Government.
    Junior Drs strike has been detrimental to all other health workers, including Gps Consultants and Nurses.

    well done BMA you gave the health
    sec bloody nose, but isnt this supposed to be about patient care and drs pay and conditions, whats politics got to do with it??

  • All the reaction to the junior doctor contract imposition

    Peter Brigg's comment 11 Feb 2016 11:47pm

    "Lions led by donkeys"
    is the phrase that springs to mind here.

    the sad thing is seeing history repeating itself.
    the BMA is sadly like so many large organisations of medically qualified people with the honorary title of "Dr", becoming intoxicated with its self perceived illusion that it represents the voice of the profession, ignoring as it does the silent majority or significant minority.

    idealogical and politically motivated obsession with taking on the evil tories has caused them to send the naive and idealist junior Drs into a battle with the government which they cannot win and will irreperably damage the reputation of the whole profession.

    there are many things wrong with Drs pay and conditions, but poverty and financial exploitation are not one of them, and striking has been totally unnescessary unless you are purely hellbent on damaging the Government.
    Junior Drs will either lose or win a Pyrric victory to the detriment of all other health workers, including Gps Consultants and Nurses.

    well done BMA you gave the health
    sec bloody nose, but isnt this supposed to be about patient care and drs pay and conditions, whats politics got to do with it??

  • Junior doctors' strike to go ahead next week after talks fail

    Peter Brigg's comment 07 Feb 2016 10:59am

    clearly hard truths hurt,and it is a self evident fact that the lack of Drs around at weekends is creating much of the stress we are hearing about. "14 hour shifts working relentlessly"etc etc occur at weekends BECAUSE there are too few Drs around and too much cross cover. IF as my colleagues tell me, more deaths occur at weekends because they are more complex, sicker etc etc, then as caring commited Drs, we should be going to Mr Hunt and asking, sorry demanding him to increase the number of Drs and services at weekends.
    at risk of finding crowds of junior Drs outside my surgery shouting "scab". I will state again that the strike is so pointless on so many levels.
    it does seem to be motivated by the disagreement with the political principles of the government rather than real medical argument. drs may deserve more pay and do work long hours but the strike is so pointless on so many levels. Drs are still very adequately paid and it is a vocation and a profession. it has until now been trusted and respected which money cannot buy and these strikes will quickly lose all of this.

  • How to solve a problem like acopia?

    Peter Brigg's comment 03 Feb 2016 9:01pm

    saddened by the usual pathetic too clever by half comments of dr anonymous NHS acopites. this is a great article and identifies a reletively simple and common consultation challenge.
    hardly a reason for giving up medecine.
    please remember "the patient is not the enemy"
    the vitriol often displayed by my anonymous colleagues gives a clue to the level of their ability to show empathy or sympathy with a patient with an albeit trivial problem that happens to make them feel ill.
    the arrogant presumption that every patient we see should have the same 5A* brain of britain intelect as us hugely underpaid impoverished newly qualified Drs, to work out the obvious difference between a virus that makes you feel like "death warmed up" and a bacteria that might kill you but probably wont beggars belief.
    in a sentence, if you cant stand the heat; get out of the kitchen.
    i am not a socialist,i agree in fair pay etc but drs are well paid and will never go hungry.
    what other profession almost guarantees £70,000 FOR a 2 (long) day week age 28yrs
    fforget the strikes and th "nuclear deterrent".
    get on with the job.
    if you dont there are millions of others who are just as capable and would love to do your job.
    you are killing the golden goose and the publics trust in the profession.

  • 'Striking is just something doctors should not do'

    Peter Brigg's comment 15 Jan 2016 0:30am

    ps i dont support strriking. it achieves nothing, and mass walkouts unlike mass meetings wont improve patient care.
    and seriously folks it isnt professional.
    maybe when we have the 7day nhs we can have meetings on sundays. say 10.00am (sorry god).

  • 'Striking is just something doctors should not do'

    Peter Brigg's comment 15 Jan 2016 0:21am

    so the day fter the junior drs strike we discover that all the GPs in North-East Hants and South-East Surrey CCG have abandonned their Surgeries for the day, leaving them to be covered by "emergency only" staff from the local OOH service and 111. All this in order to attend a presentation on the government's flagship plan for community services ; aka "VANGARD" (the first into battle ironically aka "the forlorn hope soldiers" /death or glory (but mostly death).
    how ironic; "meetings have allways been the simplest means of work avoidance" for stressed nhs workers.
    aparently more walkouts sorry meetings are planned and it has nothing atall to do with politics said one harrased looking GP on the way home at 5.00pm after the meeting , which was as usual very stimulating with lotsof bluesky thinking on a new way of delivering patient centered health care etc etc etc...