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Thomas Quinn

  • NHS services have become an all-you-can-eat buffet

    Thomas Quinn's comment 16 Oct 2014 6:51pm

    Thank you for an excellent entry.

    If it's free - it's a cheap commodity that can be thrown away.

    When there's a £30 billion pound funding gap - can the tax payer really afford to subsidise the non-attenders, the frequent fliers and inappropriate users?

  • Practice hands contract back after four partners are forced to resign

    Thomas Quinn's comment 15 Sep 2014 7:33pm

    Sad but not surprised. Patients lose out when general practice is undermined to extinction.

    Piecemeal resignations will only increase local pressures.There should be a coordination from the BMA for potential resignation of all NHS GP surgeries in unison in anticipation of NHS GP Contract negotiations. The NHS collapses if there is no primary care gatekeeper. Disaster for the government prior to elections. We actually have a very strong hand!

  • Practices to be given 12 months before closure following poor CQC rating

    Thomas Quinn's comment 14 Aug 2014 2:36pm

    Is a failing practice an indictment of the individual practice or the DoH which fails to fund them?

  • GPs to be 'named and shamed' after missing cancer diagnoses

    Thomas Quinn's comment 30 Jun 2014 10:08pm

    Our GP leaders are to slow to respond to this succession of attacks on general practice. Time to go on the offensive!

    If Jeremy Hunt cares about raising standards, why then is he starving primary care of funding?

    If Jeremy Hunt cares about the delay for GP appointments, why doesn't he increase GP numbers?

    If Jeremy Hunt cares about patients, why then is he continuing to demonise their GPs who look after them?

    If Jeremy Hunt cares about the NHS, then why doesn't he support GPs who sustain it?

  • Dr Dean Marshall: 'Patients are beginning to realise their local practice is under strain'

    Thomas Quinn's comment 16 May 2014 2:15pm

    The problem is not training, the problem is resources.

    If more GP's retire, or immigrate abroad, and less trainees become GPs, then there will be a shortage of GPs - which is what we have. If you have the second lowest hospital bed numbers per 1000 people in Europe - which is what we have - then there are going to be many patients, who should be in hospital, in the community. Someone needs to care for them - who is it?

    As an aging population with complex problems increases, they will be require more input from GP's/District Nurses. On average a home visit takes me a half an hour, in the same time I can see 2.5-3x patients in the surgery. If with an aging population, visits increase, how will GP's manage to care for people safely without more GP's and resources?

    The objective is not to side with any one political party, but to use Mass Resignation as leverage, to obtain a fairer more sustainable deal in order to improve standards and quality of care.

  • Dr Dean Marshall: 'Patients are beginning to realise their local practice is under strain'

    Thomas Quinn's comment 14 May 2014 6:58pm

    Why not, in your forceful campaign begin to put mass resignation on the agenda? A threat for simultaneous resignation of all GPs from the NHS on the eve of the general election in May. This will get the Conservatives attention.

    Unless the DoH delivers a real plan to: 1. increased retention of GP's, 2. Increased training of GP's, and 3. increased funding of GP as per RCGP "Put Patient First Campaign", then mass resignation of GP's from the NHS from April 2015.

    The BMA could begin coordinating the practicalities of nationwide resignation of GP's from the NHS, to the private sector one month prior to the general election.

    Withdrawal of GPs from the NHS would end the NHS, suddenly destroying the election hopes of the Conservatives. This is a threat they would need to take seriously and so drive them to a better fairer deal at the negotiating table.

    Either GP's take a stand collectively resigning in unison, or GP's will leave the profession piecemeal to the prolonged but steady deterioration of the NHS.

  • It is time for the BMA to ballot GPs on mass resignation

    Thomas Quinn's comment 13 May 2014 0:13am

    Totally agreed. 110% behind you Una!

    I think the NHS is great, but actually ....clinically excellence free at the point of use, for everything, with patient choice is ridiculously unaffordable! It can only be paid for at the expense of a budget deficit, high taxes, or free labour! We know which direction the Government is going.

    And patients actually don't respect the NHS. Patients taking valuable appointments with trivial complaints, calling the ambulance instead of taking the taxi to A&E, insisting on unnecessary antibiotics, demanding inappropriate home visits, dismissing the advice of a "generalist".Common examples of patients not respecting the health care they have, but using it as a cheap commodity.

    So I think my point is this: Lets stop thinking of the "free at the point of use" NHS as the untouchable Holy Grail for which we sacrifice everything including ourselves for.

    And lets really focus on providing patients "Excellent NHS Primary Care" and we can only do this if it is appropriately funded and resourced with GPs - which does not have to be free at the point of use service, but ideally affordable to all.

  • PM’s access drive is opportunity for GPs

    Thomas Quinn's comment 29 Apr 2014 11:36am

    GP's can no longer afford to cooperate with the DoH/Conservatives strategy for health. Stretching already saturated GP's for minuscule returns is good for government headlines and soundbites but not for patient care. More GP's retiring, less GP's training, longer waiting times, poorer service all round.

    The GPC should begin threatening to refuse the 2015-16 NHS GP contract, on the eve of the general election in May. This will get the Conservatives attention.

    Unless the DoH delivers a real plan to: 1. increased retention of GP's, 2. Increased training of GP's, and 3. increased funding of GP as per RCGP "Put Patient First Campaign", then the NHS GP Contract 2015-16 should be a "No Go". Mass Resignation of GP's from the NHS from April 2015.

    The BMA and RCGP, who are quite happy to encourage and develop advice to develop Federations to demise of small practices, should INSTEAD be coordinating the practicalities of nationwide resignation of GP's from the NHS, to the private sector one month prior to the general election.

    Withdrawal of GPs from the NHS would end the NHS, suddenly destroying the election hopes of the Conservatives. This is a threat they would need to take seriously and so drive them to a better fairer deal at the negotiating table.

    Either GP's take a stand collectively resigning in unison, or GP's will leave the profession piecemeal to the prolonged but steady deterioration of the NHS.

    Come on BMA! Adjust those sails and put it to ballot! GP Mass Resignation April 2015

  • Seven GPs elected to BMA Council

    Thomas Quinn's comment 22 Apr 2014 11:12pm

    Congratulations Una Coales! Behind you 110%

  • Practices' income cut by thousands as NHS England devalues QOF

    Thomas Quinn's comment 19 Apr 2014 10:29pm

    GP NHS Resignation April 2015

    Thanks Una and Ahmed. If GP's are serious about saving the NHS we must stand up against the DoH. The NHS will collapse without GP's. I agree that industrial action in the form of a one day strike would not achieve anything.

    I suggest that prior to the general election in May 2015, the GPC should pull the rug out of the Conservative led coalition, by refusing the 2015-16 NHS GP Contract.

    I believe that unless the DoH agreed to; 1. The increase of funding to primary care to the 11% as per RCGP's "Put Patients First" campaign, 2. Within this increase, to increase the payment per patient or cost per consultation provided, and 3. Increase the proportion of GP training and GP specialisation relative to specialist training, then the BMA together with the support of the RCGP should threaten to refuse the 2015-16 NHS GP Contract and coordinate the nationwide resignation of GP's from the NHS, thus becoming private from April 2015, one month prior to the general election.

    If Labour agreed to the terms, then voters would have a very clear decision come Election Day. Private GP's and No NHS under the Conservatives or NHS GP's and NHS under Labour. This would hand Labour the election.

    Peter Holden is right - there is one year to save the NHS. There is one year until the election. Right now, the GPC and RCGP should be; 1. Developing advice and making preparations to coordinate all NHS GPs to move away from financial dependence on NHS England to the private sector in unison as this will credibility to the threat, and 2. Begin negotiating with Labour to provide NHS GP services following the election should they endorse the terms.

    Better than a fruitless one day strike would be (hopefully) only a limited period of a privatised GP service. Surgeries would have to make concessions to fees for the young, elderly, and those on welfare as we wouldn't want the vulnerable to suffer.

    Withdrawal of GPs from the NHS would end the NHS, suddenly destroying the election hopes of the Conservatives. This is a threat they would need to take seriously and so drive them to a better fairer deal at the negotiating table.

    GP NHS Resignation April 2015

  • Practices' income cut by thousands as NHS England devalues QOF

    Thomas Quinn's comment 18 Apr 2014 1:32am

    The GPC have let us down again!

    Our GP leaders GPC/RCGP/CCG's have been too compliant for too long with the Government and the DoH which is adversely affecting primary care.

    It's clear that the DoH, with loss of MPIG, below inflation uplift, stretching surgeries to 24/7, cuts to QOF today, are driving practices to bankruptcy.

    We need new leaders who should begin planning to coordinate national withdrawal of GP practices from the NHS. This is the only leverage against the DoH.