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A question of trust as GMC fights for its life

The GMC's response this week to the 17 points of criticism from the Shipman Inquiry's solicitor is, for the most part, robust, well argued and welcome.

It also reveals that six years after the Bristol scandal and four years after Shipman, the GMC still has much to do. In at least seven areas, the GMC's answers refer to work in progress, new consultation, or pilots.

On perhaps the most damaging charges of 'prejudice' and 'expediency' we get little more than assertions that the inquiry is just plain wrong.

Worryingly, as GMC member Dr Krishna Korlipara explains on page 10, the council believed these 'extremely dispiriting' points had already been 'successfully addressed' by its evidence to the inquiry.

And that is what should frighten doctors most ­ the GMC's apparent inability to convince those who scrutinise it that it has put its house in order, that it can be trusted. The leaked letter is a wake up-call. The GMC is in a fight for its life.

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