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At the heart of general practice since 1960

Ballot verdict will be just the starting point

One thing is clear about the new contract. Even if it is approved, there will be many unanswered questions and much work to do before general practice can move forward. GPs were originally told that, by the time they came to vote, a fully-priced contract would have been hammered out, with immediate gains to reward them for a Yes vote.

A Yes vote, however, requires a great leap of faith. There is the clear advantage of new investment in primary care and the ability to opt out of out-of-hours care ­ but GPs lack the information to work out how much of the money will come the way of their own practice.

A No vote gives GPs the chance to make their feelings clear to a much-mistrusted Government ­ but it is a high-risk strategy that could see GPs faced with no option other than a reluctant switch to PMS to preserve the viability of their practice. The choice is yours.

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