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Bowel cancer is four different diseases, summer babies are healthier and good news for sofa dwellers

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines

Bowel cancer is four different diseases, each with a different prognosis, scientists have discovered.

The BBC reports that doctors might be able to use this knowledge to better determine which patients need the most aggressive treatment, the Institute of Cancer Research team say.

They looked at laboratory and clinical data from more than 3,000 patients with bowel cancer to see if they could better classify the disease.

Nearly all of the tumours could be sorted into the four groups.

Babies born in the summer are more likely to be heavier at birth, taller as adults and healthier overall, a study at Cambridge University has found.

Researchers at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Epidemiology Unit concluded that pregnant mothers getting more time in the sunshine may be responsible for the differences but said further tests were needed, the Independent reports.

More than half a million people were involved in the study, published in the journal Heliyon, which studied the growth and development of UK men and women.

And finally, sitting down is no worse for you than standing up as long as you take regular exercise, a study has claimed, casting doubt over increasingly fashionable sit-stand work stations which claim to be better for your health.

The research by British academics also challenged advice from the NHS based on other studies saying that ‘remaining seated for too long is bad for your health, regardless of how much exercise you do,’ the Guardian reports.

 

 

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