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Care Act coming into force, bosses don't believe in mental health and how sexual activity affects the baby's gender

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines

A few papers choose to highlight major changes to the care system coming into force today.

The BBC, which refers to it as ‘the biggest shake-up for 60 years’, says the Care Act 2014 brings new rights for caretakers and givers, including national eligibility criteria establishing when someone is entitled to help; a council duty to offer loans for resiential care to be paid off from the person’s estate after their death; giving rights to carers to be assessed and supported; and a council advice service on care for those who pay for their care themselves.

There is also a new cap on care costs to protect people’s assets set at £72,000 for those over 65, but this only comes into effect from April next year.

Seven out of 10 bosses don’t regard stress, anxiety and depression as valid reasons to take sick leave, according to a new study.

This comes despite one in four workers suffering from mental health problems at some point every year, writes The Telegraph. AXA PPP has carried out the research in light of the devastating air crash in the Alps last week which has been blamed on a co-pilot who was working despite ongoing mental health problems.

Emma Mamo, head of workplace wellbeing at mental health charity Mind, said the data was ‘hugely worrying’, adding that: ‘Employees who work within a culture where poor mental health is not considered a valid reason for time off will be reluctant to open up about their own problems.

‘Not only is looking after staff the right thing to do, but it also makes good business sense, resulting in increased productivity, morale and retention.’

Couples who have a lot of sex are more likely to have baby boys, while girls are more likely to be born to stressed women, an article in the Daily Mail claims. Although somewhat tenously linked (to more boys being born in times of war) ‘apparently frantic fornication produces more boys’, while after ‘the 1995 Japanese earthquake and in New York in the wake of the destruction of the Twin Towers in 2001’ more girls were born.

 

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