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Champagne time

And here we go! A wild world of adventure awaits us. Like many registrars you may personally know, I am poised on the brink of becoming a fully-fledged GP. It’s champagne time.

And here we go! A wild world of adventure awaits us. Like many registrars you may personally know, I am poised on the brink of becoming a fully-fledged GP. It's champagne time.

These are exciting times and there's so much to do. It's a good thing I'll soon have oodles of time to do it in. I won't be able to work until PMETB sends its solid gold certificate (at least I hope it'll be gold. At 750 pounds there must be some justification. I suppose platinum gilding would be fine or even a small solitaire tastefully poised in a corner).

But then this in turn is a moot point because like the vast majority of our sorry lot, I have no permanent job to go to. I'll need to make my way down to the job centre and get myself sorted. I need to earn at least a few bob to frame my associate membership to the college. This has now become a pre-requisite to obtaining the PMETB application form (see comment above Re: £750), so at 350 pounds it's an expensive bit of paper.

These dark ruminations aside, it has all in all been a very good year. Sure there have been the bad times. Just today I had a young lady weeping away and threatening suicide. I should have a sign on my door "Please don't weep in front of the doctor – it makes him upset". She was not weeping because I was leaving. The tears tend to come on each time her boyfriend threatens to leave. I think she sees it as a productive, mature way of dealing with the issue.

On this occasion though, he has not only left and changed his number, he has changed country. "Maybe I could go and look for him!" She sobbed "But I don't speak Portuguese!" I remained silent on this point.

On the other hand, there have been many patients who have been solid, sound, pleasantly scented and with treatable illnesses. Dare I say it but there have actually been some names that I see on my list and brighten my day. One old publican leant across my desk, pointed to his address, and said "See, you've got that there. Next time you're in Maidenhead you'd better look me up." An offer I daren't refuse.

Mind you, it's a Catch-22 situation. Those that I tend to prefer are of sound mind and body. And by definition those of sound mind and body don't tend to come to the GP. Perhaps I can put them on a new form of re-call: "6 month appointment to discuss Grand Prix results" or "3 month appointment to review photos of grandchildren".

I'm sure that this idea will go down a storm at my next job interview. Fingers crossed!

Geoff Tipper: Been a very good registrar year, now life as a fully-fledged GP awaits Geoff Tipper: Been a very good registrar year, now life as a fully-fledged GP awaits

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