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Chlamydia testing concern

Women at highest risk of contracting chlamydia are not being tested in primary care, new research suggests.

The known epidemiology of chlamydia infection rates shows 15- to 19-year-olds are most likely to test positive followed by 20- to 24-year-olds and then the over-25s.

But researchers from the University of Nottingham found nearly two-thirds of samples sent by GPs were for women aged over 25.

The study, which appeared in the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections (June), looked at 7,000 samples sent for testing during one year by 119 practices.

Although 63 per cent of tests were carried out on women over 25, the highest proportion of positive results ­ 13 per cent ­ was in 15- to 19-year-olds. Female GPs were more likely to take samples from younger women, the study showed.

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