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NICE to back use of e-cigarettes in new smoking cessation guidance

NICE is planning to back use of e-cigarettes in an update of guidelines on smoking cessation, according to new draft guidance.

In the guidance, published last month, NICE said: ‘Some smokers have found them helpful to quit smoking cigarettes and there is currently little evidence on the long-term benefits or harms of 15 these products.’

Public Health England and the Royal College of Physicians have already stated that e-cigarettes are significantly less harmful to health than tobacco, the guidance says. 

The new guidance on smoking cessation is expected to be published early next year and will replace NICE guidance on smoking cessation last published in 2008.

NICE said that smokers often ask healthcare practitioners about using e-cigarettes to help them stop smoking and that its committee had agreed that advice should be provided to allow an informed discussion of e-cigarettes as an aid to smoking cessation.

The new draft guidance comes just months after a study found that teenagers were more likely to start smoking after using e-cigarettes.

 

Readers' comments (1)

  • I have not smoked since 31 Dec 2014. The hard part previously has been avoiding relapse at times of stress. In this context I have found e-cigarette (vape device) invaluable. The best devices are not easy to set up so I advise purchase from shop, not online, to get it set up correctly. Suggest quit normal cigarettes, wait for pangs to happen, then use vape. OK it's not totally safe but no CO2, no tar, no lingering smell, low cost. BMJ says

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