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Pharmacists should fit IUDs, say MPs

Pharmacies should be allowed to provide contraception and fit intrauterine devices (IUDs) in a bid to tackle unplanned pregnancies, says a report from MPs.

The cross-party inquiry of MPs into why terminations have risen over the past decade concluded that CCGs should commission providers such as pharmacies to widen access to long- and short-acting contraception, particularly in older women.

The report cited 2011 DH figures that showed abortion rates have risen 7.7% since 2001, with a 10% rise in abortion rates in women aged 30 to 34 years over the past three years.

They challenged the ‘patchy’ provision of emergency contraception in England, stating that the introduction of a national enhanced service for emergency contraception would be vital in ‘helping to minimise and even removing the chance of geographic inequalities in terms of access.’

It said CCGs should be set minimum requirements for contraception provision, including the prioritisation of providing long-acting reversible contraception (LARCs), and train more healthcare professionals in the provision of short- and long-term contraceptive methods.

The report concluded: ‘Pharmacies have been developed as a valuable resource in terms of emergency contraception and condom provision, but they also need to be promoted as a resource for better provision of regular and longer term contraceptive methods. For instance, increasing capacity to provide emergency IUD fitting when women present at services for emergency contraception, should be prioritised.’

The inquiry committee included MPs from the Labour party, Conservative party and Liberal Democrat party, and representatives from the 2020health think tank. 

http://www.2020health.org/2020health/Publication/Wellbeing-and-Public-Health/Unplanned-Pregnancy.html

Readers' comments (21)

  • Well, they can also do TOP`s, normal deliveries and elective caesareans to decrease pressure on NHS. While at it they may be able to compete with heart surgeons to increase competitiveness in NHS.
    Is it April 1st already?

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  • Difficult to where to finish picking holes in this plan............ perhaps they could do some swabs and smears and dabble in some colposcopy while they are there!!!

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  • Er, am I hearing this right? Perhaps the complete lack of privacy, the lack of clinical competence and the inappropriate environment are of no concern to the average punter anymore.

    What about all the family planning clinics they closed down...

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  • they dont let GP's do it, where are these MP's from? planet Mars?

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  • Before you all start juimping up and down and making any comments, I as a pharmacists am just as appalled at the idea.
    I think the anonymous comments about lack of privacy, environment etc are unhelpful - I for one would not try to provide any service until I had completed the training required and had the correct environment (as set out by the service commissioner)

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  • i wouldnt want an IUD fitted in a pharamcy with punters queing up for their medication and methadone

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  • I think the term is RALMFAO!

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  • I really don't see any problem with this - anyway, must dash, just off to see my dentist for a colonoscopy!

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  • If lady presents to a pharmacist for emergency contraception the best method should be available. We now have 2 types of oral method, but an IUCD would be best choice. Surely we need locality provision of emergency IUCD, and all our pharmacy colleagues could direct patients there ? Giving oral form first in case they never get there.

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  • Pulse love to sensationalise don't they? This is a 28 page report and there is one line in a paragraph relating to pharmacy services that says "For
    instance, increasing capacity to provide emergency IUD fitting when women present at services for emergency contraception, should be prioritised."
    There is a lot of other good stuff here that deserves the headlines.

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