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Coffee enemas proof that there's one born every minute

You wouldn't catch me having a litre and a half of Starbucks' medium roast up my jacksie as a luxury 'treat', but there's no shortage of suckers out there willing to shell out for pointless 'treatments'.

You wouldn't catch me having a litre and a half of Starbucks' medium roast up my jacksie as a luxury 'treat', but there's no shortage of suckers out there willing to shell out for pointless 'treatments'.


I live and work too close to Lakeside Shopping Centre to avoid the occasional enforced afternoon's retail therapy with the Beloved Mrs C.

She trawls the fashion racks for the perfect outfit, I head straight for the retail outlets known as "Adult Male Crèches" – the gadget shops, the ones with scale models of the car I owned as a houseman (below left) and the ones with the latest i-Pods.

En passant I'm always amazed by the crowds in the "health spa at home experience" outlets.

None of them appear to have adopted my suggested advertising slogan, "Treatments you can't afford that won't work for diseases you haven't got" even if they all seem to adhere rigidly to my proposed mission statement, "There's one born every minute and we're out to get her money."

If researchers at the University of Southampton are to be believed then the women trying to choose between their snake oil buying opportunities might not be as dumb as they look.

A significant proportion of them accept that non-medical therapies have no real benefit and merely view them as luxurious little "treats" rather than a cure for anything in particular.

I really don't see the fun in lying down for half an hour with hot pebbles resting on the small of your back or in having a litre and a half of Starbucks' medium roast stuffed up your jacksie and if there's no perceived health benefit, I'm forced to ask, "What's the sodding point?" or to use the researchers' own vernacular, to contemplate this incongruence with existing expert-led taxonomy.

"Trick or Treat" or "Trick or Treatment"? Either way, someone's making a fast buck.

Copperfield blog Triumph TR7 - The car Copperfield owned as a houseman Triumph TR7

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