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Daily Digest 10 November 2009

Today's roundup - including a BMA report claiming widespread sexism in the profession and news that hospital infection deaths may actually be rising

By Ian Quinn

Today's roundup - including a BMA report claiming widespread sexism in the profession and news that hospital infection deaths may actually be rising

Male doctors earn £15,000 a year more than their female counterparts, according to a report on the front page of today's Guardian.

The paper features a BMA-funded study carried out by researchers at the University of East Anglia and Imperial College London, which alleges there is widespread discrimination and a ‘hostile culture' at work between the sexes.

No doubt the story will make for interesting debate in the male-dominated corridors of power at BMA headquarters.

Superbugism rather than sexism is the focus of the top health story in many of today's papers, which is more concerned with our disease-ridden hospital corridors.

MPs have found eight in 10 hospital infections are going unreported and patients are dying because NHS trusts are focusing on just two Government–targeted varieties, the notorious MRSA and C. difficile.

The House of Common's public accounts committee claims the DH has ‘taken its eye off the ball', with the failure to monitor other bugs such as E-coli meaning the number of hospital deaths could be rising rather than falling as ministers have previously claimed.

Some rare good news in the Daily Mail, today, however, as it reports cervical cancer could be wiped out by common drugs used to treat breast cancer and osteoporosis.

According to what the Mail says are ‘hugely important' results, one of the treatments eliminated cancer in 11 out of 13 cases and although the initial results come from poor old mice, they have been deemed safe for use on humans, meaning they could be on the market as cervical cancer teratments far quicker than most newly discovered miracle cures.

The Mail also reports on a scientific breakthrough which could herald a drug to prevent hearing loss in old age.

And if that doesn't keep the elderly happy, they should also have the right to die at home, says the paper, under plans to be unveiled today by Health Secretary Andy Burnham.

Spotted a story we've missed? Let us know and we'll update the digest throughout the day...

Daily Digest 10 November Daily Digest 10 November

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