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Daily Digest 23 September 2009

By Gareth Iacobucci

Today's round-up of the GP and other health stories making the headlines.

What was that old cliché about a woman's touch? According to The Independent, women make safer doctors than men, as proven, apparently, by latest figures showing female doctors are two-thirds less likely to be referred for clinical investigation than men. The figures from the National Clinical Assessment Service (NCAS) show that older male doctors are more likely than any other group to be referred.

The assisted suicide debate has also resurfaced this morning, with most papers reporting on the publication of controversial new guidelines. The Daily Telegraph leads on the possibility that family members who help relatives to commit suicide when they are not suffering from a terminal illness are more likely to face prosecution.

The Daily Mail is one of a number to report on the revelation that August is the worst month to be admitted to hospital. Researchers found hospital mortality rates shot up by 6% on the first Wednesday of the month, dubbed, in suitably understated fashion, as ‘Black Wednesday'.

The news that one in a hundred adults has some form of autism has also made headlines this morning, with The Guardian choosing to focus on the implications for the controversial MMR jab, which it reassuringly suggests, is now ‘off the hook'.

On a similar note, The Telegraph reports on NICE's plans for kids' medical records will be checked when they start school to see if they have been vaccinated against a list of illnesses.

Next time anyone struggles to explain the corrosive binge drinking among young women, refer them to new research, as documented by The Mail, which suggests that millions of women drink alcohol before having sex because they lack confidence in their bodies.

And finally, it seems we're a nation of sex maniacs. Well, not quite - but The Daily Mirror reports on the disturbing find that due to the ‘sex degrees of separation', the average British adult has indirectly slept with nearly three million people.

Spotted a story we've missed? Let us know and we'll update the digest throughout the day

Daily Digest

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