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Daily Digest 26 November 2009

Today's roundup - including new research linking broken sleep and asthma, and a 'Boot in Mouth' moment at the homeopathy inquiry.

By Steve Nowottny

Today's roundup - including new research linking broken sleep and asthma, and a 'Boot in Mouth' moment at the homeopathy inquiry.

Top billing for a health story today goes to yesterday's evidence session on homeopathy held by the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee.

The Daily Mail reports the story under the headline ‘Homeopathy? Boots sell it (but don't know if it works)', highlighting what it gleefully dubs a ‘Boot in Mouth moment'.

Paul Bennett, professional standards director at Boots, told MPs that despite his company selling a whole range of homeopathic products – the Mail namechecks arnica, St John's wort, flower remedies and calendula cream – there is no medical evidence that they actually work.

‘There is certainly a consumer demand for these products,' he said, in a statement the paper claims has clear Ratner-esque overtones. ‘I have no evidence to suggest they are efficacious.'

The Mail also has a story on a tiny skin implant – ‘a disc the size of a fingernail' – which has proved able to wipe out melanoma in up to half the cases it was tested on, using proteins usually found on skin tumours to help trigger an immune response.

The Daily Telegraph reports that researchers led by the University of Edinburgh have identified a gene which could be responsible for depression, bipolar disorders and schizophrenia.

And also in the Telegraph, there's new research linking broken sleep to asthma. Researchers in Australia and Canada found that children who woke up twice or more times a week up to the age of three were twice as likely to go on to develop asthma.

Spotted a story we've missed? Let us know and we'll update the digest throughout the day...

Daily Digest

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