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Daily Digest 26 October 2009

Today's roundup - including the cereal which is 'saltier than crisps', and the first computer game to be endorsed by the Department of Health.

By Steve Nowottny

Today's roundup - including the cereal which is 'saltier than crisps', and the first computer game to be endorsed by the Department of Health.

We start this week with a story in the Guardian that more than 90% of women are ‘denied a choice of where they give birth' – this despite a Government pledge that all mothers-to-be in England would have the right by the end of this year. A study by the National Childbirth Trust suggests just 4.2% of pregnant women in the UK get to choose whether to have their baby in hospital, at a birth centre or at home.

Both the Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail carry a story ahead of a Channel 4 Dispatches investigation, to be broadcast tonight, which reveals that breakfast cereals ‘contain more sugar than a jam doughnut', with some also ‘saltier than crisps'.

The Independent carries a study by Oxford University researchers which claims to have discovered why children of older men are more likely to have health problems.

The fall-out from the appalling standards uncovered at the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust continues in the Daily Mirror, with the news that there's a ‘New job for doctor from hell hospital'. Dr Helen Moss, who was in charge of nursing and governance at the hospital, is to leave for a ‘better job' at an undisclosed health trust.

The Daily Telegraph reports that the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus – which goes on sale this Friday – is to become the first computer game to be endorsed by the Department of Health.

The weekend's news that musicals guru Lord Andrew Lloyd-Webber has been diagnosed with prostate cancer prompts coverage of the disease in a number of papers.

And finally, we're used to shock-horror stories of medical malpractice filling up newspapers, but this is a new one… or rather, a very old one. The Telegraph reports that a ‘bungling doctor' was to blame for the poet John Keats' death, after wrongly diagnosing tuberculosis as stress.

According to a new book, Dr James Clark, who was to become Queen Victoria's personal doctor, spent a month treating Keats for anxiety and a stomach ailment – and even after he discovered the poet had TB, made a series of further blunders. Read the full story here.

Spotted a story we've missed? Let us know and we'll update the digest throughout the day...

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