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Daily Digest 3 November 2009

Today's roundup – including swine flu fears for pregnant mothers and the truth about how often men think about sex.

By Ian Quinn

Today's roundup – including swine flu fears for pregnant mothers and the truth about how often men think about sex.

Pregnant women with swine flu are 10 times more likely to need intensive care, reports the Daily Telegraph.

It follows a warning by Dr David Salisbury, head of immunisation at the Department of Health, who told an online mothers' forum people who were pregnant were at a much greater risk of complications.

The paper reports that between five per cent and 30 per cent of deaths attributed to swine flu are among pregnant women or those who have recently given birth.

The Daily Mail reports on the tragic death of a Manchester mother who died just 18 days after giving birth.

Of the 137 deaths in Britain as of last week, six have been mothers-to-be, it says, carrying advice that all pregnant women should contact their GP to arrange for vaccination.

The Telegraph reports on another superbug, suggesting one extra cleaner on a hospital ward can reduce new cases of MRSA by a quarter

Whether that's true or false doesn't quite make it into the Daily Mail's must-have guide to the top medical rules/myths

If you have a few moments between appointments and you can't face talking to Stephen Fry on Twitter, why not test yourself with the merits of commonly held beliefs such as gum sticks in your gut for years, urine should be clear and men think about sex every seven seconds?

You will probably do better in the test if you happen to be in a bad mood, as the Telegraph reports on an experiment in which people were asked to judge the truth of urban myths and rumours, with the results showing that people in a negative mood were less likely to believe them.

People in a stinker, it suggests, have an increased memory and better judgement.

So when the storm clouds descend with a winter of swine flu, pay freezes and NHS cuts to come, there is a silver lining after all.

Spotted a story we've missed? Let us know and we'll update the digest throughout the day...

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