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Daily Digest 30 October 2009

Today's roundup – including a £3 'cure' for snoring, extremists attacking the swine flu vaccination programme and stem cell treatment for a Black Sabbath rocker.

By Nigel Praities

Today's roundup – including a £3 'cure' for snoring, extremists attacking the swine flu vaccination programme and stem cell treatment for a Black Sabbath rocker.

A number of newspapers cover the story that thousands of children are being put on anti-depressants and anti-psychotics needlessly , following figures dug up by the Conservative Party showing a rise in scripts.

A 56% increase in swine flu cases features in many of the papers, although The Times went with the unusual angle of warnings over 'extremists' targeting hospitals and handing out leaflets to persuade patients not to take part in the vaccination campaign.

In a potential solution for suffering sleeping partners everywhere, the Mirror reports on a new £3 treatment for snoring – or ‘snoreplasty' – where the back of the mouth is injected with a chemical that can prevent snoring for a year.

In a warning to all you Pepsi-lovers, the fructose syrup in soft drinks has been linked with high blood pressure, according to a report in The Mirror.

Fertility treatment is a theme in a number of newspapers, with the Daily Mail warning of a 'scrambled generation ' with new rules allowing women to use their mother's eggs for IVF treatment.

The Telegraph is calling for better screening of sperm after a donor potentially passed on the life-threatening heart condition, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, to 22 children in the US.

In a more light-hearted story, the Independent examines new evidence that backs the old wives' tale that lying down after sex can increase the chances of pregnancy.

And after more than 40 years of working a plectrum, rocker Tony Iommi's wrists have finally given out, according to The Times. The founder member of Black Sabbath is now having stem cell treatment to try and get him back on the road.

Spotted a story we've missed? Let us know and we'll update the digest throughout the day..

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