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Debate over parents' cancer boy removal, women 'can't locate vagina' and GP warnings on UK child obesity

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines on Monday 1 September.

The papers continue the debate over the actions of parents of brain tumour boy Ashya King, whose removal from an English hospital last week against the advice of doctors sparked an international man hunt. In a new online video the boy’s older brother defended the parents, the Independent reports, saying the boy’s safety was not put at risk on the journey to Spain, where they had hoped he would receive an experimental potentially more effective treatment.

In some alarming news, ‘half of young women can’t locate their vagina’, the Telegraph warns. In a survey of 1,000 British women aged 26 to 35 only half were able to locate it on a medical drawing of the female reproductive system, while a third of women between 16-35 had avoided going to the doctor with gyneacological concerns because of embarrassment.

Finally, the GPs have declared a ‘state of emergency’ on childhood obesity, with the Sunday Times yesterday reporting on RCGP warnings that it is in danger of ‘destroying the health of a whole generation of children’ and overwhelming the NHS. In an open letter to chief medical officer Dame Sally Davies, the college and 11 other organisations jointly called for a national child obesity action group to be set up by the Government.

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