Cookie policy notice

By continuing to use this site you agree to our cookies policy below:
Since 26 May 2011, the law now states that cookies on websites can ony be used with your specific consent. Cookies allow us to ensure that you enjoy the best browsing experience.

This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

Did I miss something? I thought the Government had finally got it

  • Print
  • Comments (4)
  • Rate
  • Save

Hang on a sec, did the last few months not actually happen? Did I slip into an exhaustion-induced coma in which I dreamt that NHS England had, at last, ‘got’ the desperate state of general practice and the GPC had gone all macho and militant? I ask, because I suddenly find myself reading headlines suggesting that GPs are ‘ideally placed’ to sort out pre-diabetes, and will be incentivised to do so via QOF tweaks and new enhanced services.

I’d quite like to go back into that coma

Let’s set aside for a moment the not inconsiderable points that a) dealing with pre-diabetes is going to be a gonad-grindingly huge and tedious task, worse even than looking after actual diabetics and b) even if we do identify everyone at risk of diabetes (aka ‘everyone’), there probably won’t be any exercise or diet classes locally to send them to, so any management plan would be down to, let’s think, oh yes, me.

Look, even if I did want to take this on and, as you can probably tell, I don’t, I don’t understand why I’m being given the ‘opportunity’. Because, before I slipped back into this God-awful pre-GP Forward View/pre-Urgent Prescription for General Practice parallel universe, I was quite enjoying another one in which the Government realised we GPs already have enough work to do and the GPC was suggesting that QOF was soon going to be clad in concrete boots and dumped into the nearest canal.

Or maybe I misconstrued in a positive light comments along the lines that ‘Workload and QOF are going to be “sorted out”’. Where I work, being ‘sorted out’ doesn’t mean being ramped up, it means being beaten up. And on that topic, would someone kindly punch me in the face? I’d quite like to go back into that coma.

Dr Tony Copperfield is a GP in Essex. You can follow him on Twitter @DocCopperfield

Rate this blog  (4.98 average user rating)

Click to rate

  • 1 star out of 5
  • 2 stars out of 5
  • 3 stars out of 5
  • 4 stars out of 5
  • 5 stars out of 5

0 out of 5 stars

Readers' comments (4)

  • I dont think they would ever stop crapping on us!!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • They learn by example- it'll take us to stop crapping on ourselves first.
    Repeat after me: 'I am really worthy'- look where doing this simple daily exercise has got Bankers and Politicos.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • You thought the government had got it? They could have as even the dumbest wit can get that flashing brainwave but, as becomes of nimble wits, they always let it pass.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Presumably "pre-diabetes" is part of a "pre-death"syndrome, which follows shortly after "post-birth".
    I blame nurses for medicalising anything with a backside the size of Wales instead of "signposting" them to B&Q to get a padlock for the fridge.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

  • Print
  • Comments (4)
  • Rate
  • Save

From: Copperfield

Dr Tony Copperfield is a jobbing GP in Essex with more than a few chips on his shoulder