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Don't lose sleep over nurses being let loose with FP10 pad

The increase in the number of nurse prescribers came about as a result of Government direction and to improve the quality of care for patients.

I agree that prescribing training should be linked to advanced clinical practice courses. I undertook the MSc in Advanced Practice at UCE which did incorporate the Independent and Supplementary prescribing course. Without the skills and knowledge I had already learned through differential diagnosis and clinical health assessment modules, I would have found it significantly more difficult.

I do, however – as will every nurse who reads this article – take great offence at Professor Hugh McGavock's comment that ‘nurses' knowledge of diagnosis is pathetically poor'.

This generalised comment is unfair to those who have spent time and effort on their training. Nurses should only prescribe within their competence and should receive regular clinical supervision.

From Karen Mayne,advanced nurse practitioner, Herefordshire PCT

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