Cookie policy notice

By continuing to use this site you agree to our cookies policy below:
Since 26 May 2011, the law now states that cookies on websites can ony be used with your specific consent. Cookies allow us to ensure that you enjoy the best browsing experience.

This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

Fears over vaccine risks 'overblown'

Public concerns that vaccines could be linked with increased autoimmune disease are over-blown, as an association has rarely been proved, a review has concluded.

But vigilance is needed when new vaccines are introduced to ensure they do not provoke autoimmune reactions, warns the review, co-written by Professor David Wraith of the department of pathology and microbiology at the University of Bristol.

The review of studies into the effect of vaccination on autoimmune disease, published in The Lancet, outlines the possible causes and triggers of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease, and highlights that only a large-scale trial or epidemiological study can provide proof.

It says patients are not at risk of exacerbation from being given any of the available vaccines, but 'only a comprehensive and multidisciplinary strategy can help to reduce the risk that a new vaccine will induce auto-immune manifestations'.

Rate this article 

Click to rate

  • 1 star out of 5
  • 2 stars out of 5
  • 3 stars out of 5
  • 4 stars out of 5
  • 5 stars out of 5

0 out of 5 stars

Have your say