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Fertility problems linked to birth complications, cancer carers 'failed by the NHS' and is sugar the new tobacco?

Our round-up of the health news headlines on Thursday 9 January.

Women who experience fertility problems are more likely to suffer complications with the birth of their child, research covered by the Telegraph today concludes.

The study, which looked at 300,000 births over 17 years, found babies conceived through IVF or other fertility treatments were twice as likely to be still-born, suffer birth defects or die within 28 days than those conceived naturally.

Hundreds of thousands of carers for patients with cancer are being failed by the NHS, according to a survey reported in the Daily Mirror.

The poll by the charity Macmillan Cancer Support found 37% of carers reported the NHS did not give them information or advice about sevices available, while 43% of those who accompanied a loved one when they were diagnosed with cancer said they were not offered care advice or pointed towards support.

Could sugar really be as dangerous as alcohol or tobacco? That’s the alarming claim in the Telegraph, which reports that a group of health experts and academics have come together to form a campaign group called ‘Action on Sugar’.

Professor Simon Capewell, professor of clinical epidemiology at the University of Liverpool, is quoted as warning that ‘sugar is the new tobacco’. The group is calling on the food industry to reduce the amount of sugar in processed foods by between 20% and 30% over the next three to five years - and urging the Government to fine companies who do not meet reduction targets.

Spotted a story we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments and we’ll update the digest throughout the day…

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