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Further reading - Athlete’s Foot

GPs can adequately manage the majority of chlamydia infections and should not routinely refer them to GUM clinics, researchers conclude.

Their study found 67 per cent of patients referred to a GUM clinic had been treated appropriately and 68 per cent were no longer chlamydia-positive.

Of treated patients, only

9 per cent were still positive and half of these were still positive after GUM clinic treatment.

The research, presented to the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology congress in London this week, studied 100 consecutive cases referred to a clinic in 2003.

Study leader Dr Amanda Davies, clinical assistant at the department of genitorurinary medicine, Cardiff Royal Infirmary, said: ‘We would like to see more cases managed in primary care and not referred just because they have got chlamydia.'

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