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Fury over 'secret' flu jab, call for foreign doctors 'induction' and why not every mushroom puts the 'fun' in fungi

Our round-up of health news headlines on Friday 16 September 2011.

Doctors are furious over the decision not to advertise the free flu jab, The Guardian says today.

Dr John Middleton, vice-president of the Faculty of Public Health, told the paper: 'It's inexplicable that ministers haven't learned the lessons of last year.' Over 600 people died after contracting the flu during its last blast.

Andrew Lansley has left it in GPs' hands, to advertise the free vaccine instead of using a national public health campaign .

'There is no additional merit in a vaccination advertising campaign for the general population when there is already a targeted approach for those who need to be called,' he said.

'People who are at risk, and indeed pregnant women and over-65s, should be taking up the offer of vaccination, they have been contacted by their GP surgeries.'

The GMC says newly-qualified and foreign doctors need to go on a basic induction course before working in the UK, the Independent reports.

A new report, published today, found some new foreign doctors start clinical practice with little or no preparation for working in the UK, while some locums are taking on duties without appropriate training.

Lastly, if you go down to the woods today, you're sure of a big surprise. Almost 130 people have been poisoned after eating toxic wild mushrooms, The Telegraph warns its readers.

Most cases involve children eating wild mushrooms - which can be deadly - believing them to be as harmless as the cultivated varieties. However, almost 40 have involved adults deliberately eating them, the National Poisons Information Service says.

Dr John Cooper, director of the HPA's centre for radiation, chemicals and environmental hazards, advised people to be aware of that not every mushroom is your friend: 'Correctly identifying the mushrooms that are safe to pick and eat is the key to ensuring that foraging is good fun - and does not become a danger to your health.'

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