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Gastric surgery to cure type 2 diabetes

The story - Patients with type 2 diabetes could be offered gastric surgery after researchers found it had the potential to permanently cure the condition, reported The Guardian and New Scientist.

The story - Patients with type 2 diabetes could be offered gastric surgery after researchers found it had the potential to permanently cure the condition, reported The Guardian and New Scientist.

The source

A small-scale clinical trial, published in Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, has reported that up to 98% of obese patients with late-onset diabetes appeared to be cured within weeks of surgery. Researchers led by Professor Francesco Rubino, a surgeon at the Catholic University of Rome, started the trial late last year with seven volunteers – with the first two now living without diabetes medication. The team suspects bypassing the duodenum suppresses signals in the intestine that lead to insulin resistance. They hope to seek approval to perform the operation in the US.

Expert view

Mr Simon Dexter, a consultant at Leeds general infirmary and member of the Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons of Great Britain, said: 'Gastric surgery for patients with type 2 diabetes is a new observation and is potentially a new and exciting field. Fundamentally, bypassing food passages in the duodenum is affecting the metabolism in diabetics.

'The first human case was done in Brasil and the outcomes are being looked at. And there is no reason why this type of surgery can't be introduced in the UK. There is already a drive to introduce gastric surgery in less obese people with a BMI below 35. What's new is looking at using gastric surgery in people with normal weight. But we have to get the risk balance right and understand whether the procedure is safe enough before carrying out this type of surgery.'

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