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'GP ate my hamster'-well almost

Yet more scandal has emerged this week over the privileges of being a GP, courtesy of an MDU survey revealing family docs are being showered with gifts from their patients.

Yet more scandal has emerged this week over the privileges of being a GP, courtesy of an MDU survey revealing family docs are being showered with gifts from their patients.

A survey of more than 500 doctors found gifts ranging from legacies, artworks, vintage champagne, handmade embroidery and poems of thanks.

GPs fared the best out of all doctors, with some of the more unusual offering including some washing up liquid, a pair of tights, an ashtray, replicas of the Taj Mahal and a hamster.

While the gifts could be a sign that patients are actually happy with their treatment, Pulse is waiting with some trepidation for the Government's response and the headlines the national press: ‘GPs get seven wonder but still want more pay', ‘GP in smoking shocker', ‘GP accepted my hamster'.

Whatever next, GPs will be offering their sons jobs at the surgery, while they are secretly spending their time DJing at Sloany London clubs, accepting donations from people they have never heard of , perhaps because they work in a polyclinic, or seen prancing around the Big Brother house in tights mewing like a cat.

Key findings of MDU probe Key findings

41% of female doctors received flowers, compared with just 4% of male doctors , including one from a male patient

Male doctors most likely to receive alcohol as a gift (80%) while female doctors most often received chocolates (85%).

Of the 41% of doctors who reported having ethical concerns about a gift, 40% returned it to the patient, 8% kept it after discussing it with the patient and 7% rang the MDU for advice.

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