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GP who shall not be named

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I just don’t get this ‘named clinician’ business. My default position is to be completely and utterly against it, of course. But I haven’t a clue what it’s about. And I’m not convinced anyone else has, either.

The idea seems to be that there should be an ‘identifiable’ clinician – aka us – with 24/7 responsibility for vulnerable patients. In which case, there are only three possible interpretations.

1 We are responsible for the frail and elderly at all times, literally, and therefore could conceivably be called at 11pm on a Saturday night, say, at which time I’m normally scheduled to be in a Sauvignon-induced stupor. But even the most paranoid reactionary among us/psychotically GP-loathing among the Government knows this simply isn’t going to happen.

2 Each vulnerable patient requires a specific doctor who organises and co-ordinates, though doesn’t actually deliver, their care, and is the final common pathway through whom all actions and decisions pass. That care, obviously, occurs 24/7, but does not actively involve us for all those hours, equally obviously. Which is just a tweak from what happens already. It’s what we do, though there’s no reason why Jeremy Hunt should realise that, he’s only the Health Secretary.

3 GPs are, like Voldemort, he or she who shall not be named, but shall be as of now. Which is news to me. But for those labouring under this delusion, there’s a helpful clue on the consulting room door, right after the abbreviation ‘Dr’, assuming your surname’s not ‘anonymous’.

I reckon option two’s the likeliest. And that’s fine. We’re used to working harder to maintain income. If we lose some QOF nonsense to be named physicians/do what we do already, then we’re working the same to earn the same. And, these days, that counts as a victory.

Readers' comments (7)

  • Tony, you must watch Dr David Geddes interview he explains what you will be doing.......its what you are doing now. So I can only assume as he only works in general practice on a Friday he doesnt have a clue about real general practice

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  • Doc Geddes works one day a week seeing patients but expects everybody else to work seven days a week.

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  • a bit like the 'named nurse concept' around in the 80's/90's in secondary care- just meant your name was written on a scrap of paper -( usually permanent marker pen!) above a patients bed on the ward.

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  • I can see us being called to sort out 'why the career hasn't turned up' or 'I don't like pork- and that's what they've delivered with Meals on Wheels' - ' You are my named Doctor so you will sort out every problem in my life!'

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  • This is an excellent opportunity for our learned friends in legal firms, and barristers chambers! I can forsee many relatives who have abandoned their elderly ones, having a named solicitor to sort out a named GP for failing to sort out their elderly relatives bedings, meals, transport to and from hospital etc etc. This government has got GPs exactly where they want them. In a corner ready for slaughter.

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  • Nhsfatcat

    'why the career hasn't turned up'
    Great typo! I'm sure it's what our registrars are going to think!

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  • ' Named nurses ' varied daily . Still does. They know their patient details on 'Monday' but not on 'Tuesday' may know them Friday - but not Saturday etc. Not helpful at all

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From: Copperfield

Dr Tony Copperfield is a jobbing GP in Essex with more than a few chips on his shoulder