Cookie policy notice

By continuing to use this site you agree to our cookies policy below:
Since 26 May 2011, the law now states that cookies on websites can ony be used with your specific consent. Cookies allow us to ensure that you enjoy the best browsing experience.

This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

GPC 'disquiet' over ratings

GPC members are raising serious concerns about the Royal College of GPs' decision to return to talks with the Government about practice accreditation.

The RCGP was forced to pull out of negotiations in June after media reports it had agreed a compulsory scheme that would give 'star ratings' for practices.

But it voted earlier this month to restart talks, pledging there would be no rating of practices and any scheme would be voluntary.

In his bulletin to local medical medical committees, Dr Hamish Meldrum, GPC chair, said there was still 'disquiet' among committee members at the college's announcement.

Dr Meldrum said he had told RCGP chair of council, Professor Mayur Lakhani, about the concern at the announcement and the way it was handled, but said 'a public row will do neither of us any good'.

He wrote: 'Despite some

people feeling that behind-the-scenes diplomacy with the college is not working or is futile,

I do think that we need to continue to engage.'

Some form of practice accreditation was 'virtually inevitable' and it was better that GPs help shape it, he added.

However some GPC members were still angry at the RCGP's stance.

One GP who did not want

to be named said the college was 'going through one of

its periods of intense arrogance'. He said: 'The college

is putting itself in a very difficult position.'

Dr Kailash Chand, GPC

member and a GP in Ashton-

under-Lyme, said the college was 'giving way'.

He added: 'There is a huge amount of concern about the RCGP taking this role.'

Dr George Rae, GPC member and chair of Newcastle and North Tyneside LMC, said:

'If this is an agenda that is

being forced through, the lead has to be from the GPC in every decision – otherwise it's a divide and rule scenario.'

Rate this article 

Click to rate

  • 1 star out of 5
  • 2 stars out of 5
  • 3 stars out of 5
  • 4 stars out of 5
  • 5 stars out of 5

0 out of 5 stars

Have your say