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GPs are to be replaced with apps

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GPs are to be replaced with apps, NHS England has revealed.

Apps are rubbish little programmes that iphone users with too much time on their hands can download.

For example, there are apps which let you distinguish between species of raven and tell you what to say if you’re pulled over by the police.

There’s even an app which can help you identify different radiator keys with 90% accuracy.

Apps can be much more useful than that, though,’ claims one industry expert. ‘In fact there have been intense discussions around the idea of providing patients with an app that will allow them to monitor their blood pressure at home.’

Other possible medical applications include using Arkanoid to diagnose Parkinson’s, a Connect Four dementia app and a voice recognition programme to detect nasal polyps.

There is one important caveat though. The phone will bend if you mess around with it too much.

Dr Kevin Hinkley is a GP in Aberdeen.

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Readers' comments (11)

  • I was feeling quite miserable before I read this but feel better now. Thank you for making me laugh.

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  • thanks for cheering me up!

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  • When I saw the headline I was hoping you were being serious. Finally medical help 24/7, the App would not be incentivised to prescribe me ever more statins and and ever fewer antibiotics, and then sell my medical details to the highest - or is it any - bidder. Oh well, it's good to dream.

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  • ...this maybe tongue in cheek but it's actually happening ...how many of you out there have met the patient who's googled their symptoms, made a diagnosis and devised a treatment plan (usually involving an Amerian brand named drug or weird surgical intervention) and they simply popped in to get you to do the prescription and/or referral..they come in to see me all the time!

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  • Ha. Download a doc
    Ridiculous. Apps can help though.

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  • Excellent!-can we do one about forcibly harvesting GP body parts against our will to provide society with easy access to whatever they want-with an on-line ordering system-like Sainsburys, maybe 2 for 1 offers. We could be kept going with 1 kidney and a small chunk of liver until we offend a patient is some trivial way and then euthanased for the full menu.....

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  • Anonymous 10th November 1.07pm ..........GPs are not responsible for selling ANY medical details to ANY bidder. This is down to the government and the majority of GPs are totally against this. Please go find a sense of humour, preferably somewhere other than this website.

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  • I support the above comment. The article is supposed to be taken in good humour, not used as a springboard for GP bashing

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  • The article and comments above demonstrate the luddism of GPs. Some apps are clearly silly, but most Apps are an opportunity for self-monitoring, which should appeal to over-stretched GPs and help them to get patients to manage their own health. As a patient, I welcome apps, and am sad to see the cynicism and negativity of doctors

    By the way, as a patient, it is nice to be able to comment on a Pulse article. I had understood that we were verboten in the secret walled garden of GPdom.

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  • Suitable Apps could be useful *if* they meet a need felt by either patient or HPC - or preferably, both.
    However, the functions served by individual Apps do need to be linked to patient need - see Fred
    http://primaryhealthinfo.wordpress.com/2012/09/30/freds-first-app-wish-list/
    Does anyone know whether useful Apps get out of date?

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