Cookie policy notice

By continuing to use this site you agree to our cookies policy below:
Since 26 May 2011, the law now states that cookies on websites can ony be used with your specific consent. Cookies allow us to ensure that you enjoy the best browsing experience.

This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

GP's script audit picks out gaps in pain control

The most quoted recent statistic about general practice has to be the BMA and RCGP assertion that 10,000 more GPs are needed in the UK. Since it was uttered five years ago, GP numbers are up by around 3,500. But it is an influx that has merely turned the situation from critical to poorly.

So there is justified concern about changes to certification of new GPs from next month which could mean fees over £2,000 to join the profession. Prospective doctors already face huge debts to pursue their chosen career. Overseas doctors can add in visa costs as well.

These debts used to be racked up in the knowledge there was an almost cast-iron guarantee of a well-paid future. But for new GPs there is diminishing certainty. Principal jobs are disappearing. New salaried posts are less lucrative and career prospects are uncertain.

Now is not the time to put barriers in the way of becoming a GP. Otherwise recruitment will go back on the critical list.

Rate this article 

Click to rate

  • 1 star out of 5
  • 2 stars out of 5
  • 3 stars out of 5
  • 4 stars out of 5
  • 5 stars out of 5

0 out of 5 stars

Have your say