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GPs second-class specialists?

From Dr Makiian Thakur

Yeadon, Leeds

Re: GPs rushing in for quick-fix training to be a specialist provider in a very wide range of patient services that are currently provided by very well trained specialists ('GPs opt for special interests to exploit PBC opportunity', News, 13 April).

Provision of primary care by GPs has been widely recognised by most Europeans as of the highest standard, even though few of us were fortunate enough to acquire postgraduate training and experience beforehand.

For all trained doctors I would assume that taking a special vocation in any other branch of medicine will need comprehensive training under the supervision of another skilled professional.

My concern is about those who are doing very short training merely to take the opportunity to enhance their income.

PBC should primarily be aimed at improving patient care. Are extremely busy GPs now trying to embark on other specialties just to earn more money, leaving patients to be cared for by salaried doctors, or by a nurse practitioner, or just wait to get better by themselves?

In the long run I suspect services will be transferred to cheaper options, resulting in a reduction in the number of hospital grade doctors. Hopefully there will be enough left to clear up the mess caused by second-class GP specialists.

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