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Hay fever undiagnosed

The article 'Does aspartame trigger headaches?' (Clinical, May 28) has the potential to mislead your readers.

Aspartame is a dipeptide of two amino acids, phenylalanine and aspartic acid, and, after digestion, brings nothing new to the diet.

Your article reported scientific studies which found no evidence that aspartame was a trigger of headaches or migraines. The authors, however, concluded that aspartame was 'probably' the trigger for both headaches and migraines.

But as noted in the Journal of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology (35;2; April 2002;S46-S49): 'A questionnaire, however, cannot establish a link between aspartame consumption and headache; it only reflects consumers' opinions, which may be biased by the extensive media reports and speculation regarding aspartame that happened at the same time.'

Readers wanting more information should look at our website www.aspartame.info or the article cited above.

Anne Jones

Ajinomoto

London

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