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'Holy grail' of burn surgery and the diets to avoid breast cancer and ADHD

Our roundup of health news headlines on Friday 04 February.

By Laura Passi

Our roundup of health news headlines on Friday 04 February.

The Daily Mail leads with the news that ‘One in eight women will get breast cancer'. Scientists have Figures from Cancer Research UK show that 47,700 women were diagnosed in 2008, compared to 42,400 in 1999 and just 24,120 in 1978.

According to the newspaper, experts blame the rise on ‘obesity, alcohol and the growing tendency to delay motherhood.' Once again late motherhood is a cause for concern.

The Guardian reports on research from the Netherlands which has found that 'Restricted diets can help children with ADHD'. They recommend that children with ADHA ‘should be put on a restricted diet for several weeks to establish whether particular foods are the causes.' If this were the case they could be ‘diagnosed with food-induced ADHD.'

The Independent reports on the ‘tsunami of obesity', caused by the spread of Western lifestyle and food after the small Pacific nation, Nauru was ‘named as the fattest in the world.' As obesity levels rise so to do associated health problems, heart disease and stroke, linked with high blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Researchers from London and Canada say the world is facing a ‘population emergency.'

We end with an invention that has left Daily Digest open-mouthed with amazement. Reported in the Daily Telegraph, doctors have developed ‘skin spray-gun that heals severe burns within days'. Instead of sheets of skin being grown over a period of a month during which time a patient can die from infection, ‘stem cells are harvested from a small patch of healthy skin, put into a solution and sprayed back on to the affected area.' Dr Steven Wolf, of the US Army Institute of Surgical Research in Texas, describes the invention as ‘the holy grail of burn surgery'. The process takes ninety minutes, then the wound is dressed and the patient is good to go.

Spotted a story we've missed? Let us know, and we'll update the digest throughout the day...

Daily Digest - 04 February 2011

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