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At the heart of general practice since 1960

It's GPs with clean lists who lose out

Your front-page story last week said that if registered lists were to be used to work out global sums, resulting in a reduced capitation payment because of national list inflation, then practices with many ghost patients would suffer most.

It is completely the wrong way round. These are the practices that would continue to get an unfairly large portion of the sum allocated to GMS. The system would think they have extra patients, and they would get paid for them, if pay was according to registered lists. Practices with few ghosts are the ones who would suffer.

There are two other common misconceptions: Carr-Hill is frequently seen as a measure of a GP's workload ­ it is not. The formula is frequently converted into winners and losers ­ ratios under one being losers, and over one being winners. This is not true.

Dr Maurice Shipsey

Adur, Arun and Worthing PCT professional executive committe chair

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