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Life-saving surgical techniques not adopted quick enough and underweight mothers-to-be more likely to raise obese children

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines on Monday 14 April.

New life-saving surgical techniques are not being adopted quickly enough in British hospitals, writes The Guardian.

It reports on the stark conclusion of a report by the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) which warns this week that patients are missing out on new procedures because the NHS is failing to set up programmes to promote their use in the UK.

The report, Innovation to Adoption: Successfully Spreading Surgical Innovation, stresses the need to find ways to introduce new surgical techniques as quickly as possible, thus saving lives and helping the NHS to save money.

A study has suggested that women who don’t put on enough weight while they are pregnant could increase their chances of raising an obese child, the Telegraph reports.

The US study found that a child whose mother’s weight in pregnancy was either above or below the recommended level was at greatest risk of obesity.

In Britain, there is no officially recommended weight gain, but the NHS says a mother can expect to put on 22lb-26lb.

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