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At the heart of general practice since 1960

London health divide still exists

Striking health inequalities still exist in London and are not restricted to the poor inner-London boroughs.

A report from the London Health Commission published last week found most ethnic minority communities have poorer health than white British people.

The life expectancy of a

girl born in inner-city Tower Hamlets is only 79 years compared with 84 in Kensington and Chelsea.

But outer-London districts Croydon and Waltham Forest have a significantly higher number of infant deaths (seven per 1,000 live births) compared with the UK average (5.4 per 1,000 live births).

The commission also

looked at other indicators of poor health such as employment, housing, crime and education.

It found black and ethnic minority groups are 'persistently disadvantaged'.

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