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At the heart of general practice since 1960

New approach to the challenge of inherited cardiomyopathies

Where? 'Oxford, The City of Dreaming Spires, is famous the world over for its university and place in history. For over 800 years it has been a home to royalty and scholars, and since the 9th century an established town, although people are known to have lived in the area for thousands of years. With its mix of ancient and modern, there is plenty for both the tourist and resident to do.' ­ Oxford city council

Dreaming spires? Matthew Arnold's famous transferred epithet has become a kind of shorthand for the city. But it's an apt one. The city's architecture of golden stone can be breathtaking.

Work? There are 133 GPs in 30 practices within Oxford City PCT.

Homes? £565,000 for a four-bedroomed Wilkinson and Moore-designed Victorian house in a 'favoured side street'.

Schools? By far the best A-level results are achieved in the city's independent schools, although the comprehensive John Mason School in nearby Abingdon also scores well in the league tables.

Leisure? A cultural oasis as you might expect with its high population of academics and students, and the city is well placed for the countryside of the Cotswolds and beyond.

From the local press: A vicar has appeared in court accused of perjury in the trial of a funeral director convicted of giving a mother the wrong ashes after her son died.

­ BBC Oxford News May 24

Famous residents: Many a famous graduate of the university, of course, including former president Bill Clinton. Top band Radiohead still live there as does the world's fastest neurologist, Sir Roger Bannister.

Anything else? That university. It's the oldest in the English-speaking world and has 39 colleges, many of them based in architectural and historical treasure houses.

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