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Call for sugar intake to be halved, returning to normal weight from obesity is challenging and Facebook warning on skin cancer goes viral

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines

A Government advisory body is expected to tell ministers today that Britons need to halve the amount of sugar they eat to prevent an obesity epidemic, reports the Daily Mail.

The new guidelines, from the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition, suggest that no more than 5% of daily calories - or seven level teaspoons - should come from added sugar. This is equivalent to less than one can of Coca-Cola.

Researchers from King’s College, London have revealed that the chance of returning to a normal weight after becoming obese is only one in 210 for men and one in 124 for women over a year, reports the BBC.

And, for severe obesity, shedding excess weight in a year is even more unlikely, say the researchers.

The King’s College team, which says current strategies for helping obese patients are failing, is calling for ‘wider-reaching public health policies’ to prevent people becoming obese in the first place.

Finally, a woman who warned about skin cancer on Facebook has seen her post go viral.

Melanie Williams was shocked to discover that a black mark under her thumb was skin cancer, according to an article in the Mirror

Under a picture of her blackened thumb she urged others to share the post and raise awareness – the post has already been shared over 76,000 times.

Readers' comments (1)

  • Try pointing out to the general public that's it's carbohydrates causing the obesity epidemic not just sugar!

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