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GPs 'face axe' for overprescribing, aspirin helps overweight people avoid cancer and the defence of pasta on the NHS

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines

Lots of reports this morning about NICE saying antibiotic over-prescribing should be more tightly regulated, for example on how ‘soft-touch’ doctors dishing out too many antibiotics could face disciplinary action (The Telegraph), the call to punish GPs over antibiotics (the BBC) and pick of the bunch, GPs face axe for handing out too many pills (the Daily Mail).

They come after NICE chiefs said antimicrobial stewardship should form part of GPs and other prescribers’ revalidation process - and doctors who consistently prescribe outside guidelines could be referred to the GMC, as Pulse reports here.

Elsewhere, researchers are claiming taking aspirin can combat cancer in overweight people, the Daily Mail reports.

It comes from a study that showed aspirin counteracted the extra risk of colorectal cancer from being overweight among people with Lynch syndrome - who are genetically prone to the condition.

And campaigners for patients with coeliac disease have defended the prescription of gluten-free foods on the NHS, the Independent reports, after a Government report revealed £115m was spent on prescriptions for specialist foodstuffs last year.

Coeliac UK said 95% were for staples like bread and pasta that low-income patients struggle to afford or are difficult to source in rural areas.

Sarah Sleet, chief executive for the charity, said: ‘The only treatment for coeliac disease is a lifelong strict gluten-free diet. The annual cost of these prescriptions equates to £180 per patient, which makes it one of the cheapest treatments for a long-term condition on the NHS.’

 

 

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