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Hospital bosses 'milking' NHS pay rises and there are six types of obesity

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines

Hospital bosses have been accused of ‘shamelessly milking’ the NHS during one of the worst funding crises in a generation, as a Daily Mail study revealed executives took home more than £35 million in pay rises last year.

The Mail audit of Trust’s accounts and the NHS pensions scheme found some execs using a ‘loophole’ retiring for one day top draw their pensions lump sum before returning to full paid work.

It also reports union bosses and health secretaries from the main political parties calling for a further audit of the findings, with Jeremy Hunt saying: ‘A future Conservative government would ask the Department of Health to look at the Mail’s investigation in detail. Too often high executive pay has been awarded as a matter course, not because of exceptional performance.’

And The Independent reports there are six key groups of obese people that the NHS should tailor interventions to, according to researchers at the University of Sheffield.

The groups are young males who were heavy drinkers, middle aged individuals who were unhappy and anxious, older people who despite living with physical health conditions were happy, younger healthy females, older affluent healthy adults, and individuals with very poor health.

The team said currently the NHS uses a ‘one size fits all’ policy for obesity, and Dr Mark Green of Sheffield’s School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) said  ‘those in the groups that we identified are likely to need very different services, and will respond very differently to different health promotion policies.’

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