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Hospital failings, DNA blood test to treat cancer and how weight loss surgery boosts fertility

A round-up of the morning’s health news head

Most papers report on the CQC’s annual State of Care report today, leading on news that ’three in four’ hospitals are failing.

Just two out of 98 inspected hospital trusts were given the rating ‘outstanding’, writes the Telegraph.

A cheap new blood test could improve patients’ chances of beating cancer by allowing doctors to tailor treatment to their DNA.

British scientists have created a test that gives a ‘running commentary’ on how a cancer mutates, evolves and changes in the body, the Daily Mail reports.

The test, which costs £100 per patient, allows doctors to give patients drugs which are matched to the DNA of their cancer.

If the tumour changes, or becomes resistant to the drug, they can alter the treatment.

The blood test, which is taken every month throughout a patient’s cancer treatment, could be made available on the NHS within four years, say scientists from the Institute of Cancer Research in London, writes the paper.

Weight loss surgery can boost fertility, according to a report by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG).

But they said performing bariatric surgery on obese women to improve their chances of having children should only be a ’last resort’, the Mirror reports.

They found that being very overweight or obese cuts the chances of conceiving naturally while also increasing the risk of miscarriage and pregnancy complications.

But women should be urged to lose the weight in a healthy way through cutting their calorie intake and taking exercise, the RCOG said, according to the paper.

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