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Women don't seek help with breast cancer symptoms, elderly left 'struggling' by social care cuts, and hospitals to require proof of citizenship

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines

Almost a fifth of women diagnosed with breast cancer waited more than a month before consulting their GP about a potential symptom, potentially delaying their treatment.

The Guardian reports that YouGov polling found one in twenty women waited more than six months, with a third of those waiting more than a month doing so because they thought their symptoms weren’t serious.

Breast Cancer Care’s chief executive, Samia al Qadhi, said: ‘There have been many awareness raising campaigns around breast cancer symptoms, but our survey suggests that the job still isn’t done.’

Over a million elderly people have been left struggling to perform their basic routines – such as dressing and washing - because of ‘unprecedented’ withdrawal of social care funding under the Coalition Government, an Age UK report has said.

The Independent reports that Government figures show cuts to local government have seen the number of council jobs in adult social care falling by roughly 10,000 a year since 2011.

Chief executive of Age UK Caroline Abrahams said of the findings: ‘We’re not talking about it enough at this election… it’s the single issue affecting older people where you can most see something needs to be done.’

And finally, patients could be asked to show proof of British citizenship when attending hospitals, under new guidelines aiming to crackdown on health tourism.

The Telegraph reports that the Department of Health guidance to hospitals sets out a “legal obligation” to ensure they identify anyone not entitled to free treatment, which only applies to those living in the UK for more than six months.

Trusts could also be hit with fines worth thousands of pounds if they fail to implement new charges for migrants and overseas visitors.

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