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NICE rejects life-extending cancer drug, breastfeeding protects against inflammation and how cost of living is damaging our eating habits

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines on Wednesday 23 April.

NICE has decided not to recommend a cancer drug that can increase life expectancy in women with advanced breast cancer by up to six weeks because it is too expensive, The Guardian reports.

According to NICE, Kadcyla is not effective enough to justify the £90,000 per patient cost to the NHS. The decision, which is already generating debate, will now go to consultation.

The Guardian also reports that the Advertising Standards Agency has rejected a complaint from the alcohol industry about a graphic advert warning of the link between alcohol and cancer risk, after being presented with a ‘large body of  evidence’ on the link.

The Independent reports that a new study has found a link between the duration of breastfeeding in infancy and chronic inflammation - an immune system condition which increases risk of disease and early death.

The study found that shorter breast feeding duration – and lower birth weight – were linked with an increased adult level of C-reactive protein (CRP) a symptom of chronic inflammation caused by overly active immune systems and an indicator for heart disease, strokes and type-2 diabetes.

And finally the BBC reports that more than a third of adults prioritise cost over health benefits of their food when shopping, and 25% hadn’t bought a bought a single portion of fresh fruit or veg this week.

The survey of 2,444 adults was conducted by the British Heart  Foundation, which voiced concerns that the increasing costs of shopping was forcing more people to turn to cheap convenience food.

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