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NICE relaxes rules on DEXA scans

Atypical antipsychotics are no more likely to cause stroke in older people than typical anti-psychotics, researchers suggest.

The evidence contradicts a Government warning last year that patients with dementia should be taken off two atypical drugs, risperidone and olanzapine, because of a threefold rise in the risk of stroke.

Canadian researchers conducted a retrospective cohort study of 32,710 older adults with dementia. Their research was published online in the BMJ.

Dr Steve Iliffe, a GP in north London and co-director of the Centre for Ageing Population Studies, said further clarification was needed from the Committee on Safety of Medicines before a further change was made in primary care prescribing behaviour.

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