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Nurse prescribers stressed by demands of job

Nurses are ‘stressed' by taking on independent prescribing roles in general practice, despite increased job satisfaction in the role, new research had found.

The study published in Family Practice conducted interviews with six nurse practitioners who each had at least three years experience of independent prescribing in a busy inner city general practice.

It found increased work-related stress from the greater job demands, perceived insufficient support and perceived effort-reward imbalance that centred upon the enhanced role not being recognized in terms of an increase in grade and pay.

But the report also identified increased satisfaction associated with having greater autonomy and being able to provide more holistic care.

The study from the Department of Health Sciences, Liverpool Hope University, concluded: ‘Independent prescribing increases job satisfaction for nurse practitioners in general practice, but there is also evidence of stressors associated with the role.'

'It is important that nurse practitioners in general practice are encouraged and supported towards providing the effective patient-centred care in the community envisaged by current UK Government.'

‘We acknowledge that the results presented in this paper are based on a sample limited to one city; however, it provides information that has important implications for the well being of nurse practitioners and ultimately patient care.'

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