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A GP academic has found NSAIDs are safe to use in hypertensive patients in a general practice setting.

Professor Tom Fahey, a GP in Dundee, investigated how NSAIDs affected patients' blood pressure control after rising concerns over the cardiovascular risks.

But Professor Fahey, who is professor of primary care medicine at the University of Dundee, found NSAIDs had no clinically significant effect. 'We cannot conclusively say NSAIDs do not increase blood pressure, but the size of the likely rise is not likely to be too clinically important,' he said.

'Previously we thought that the rise in blood pressure for diastolic would be five millimetres of mercury, but it's more likely to be in the region of one or two.'

The study, analysing data on 184 hypertensive users of NSAIDs and 762 non-users, is published in June's Journal of Human Hypertension.

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