Cookie policy notice

By continuing to use this site you agree to our cookies policy below:
Since 26 May 2011, the law now states that cookies on websites can ony be used with your specific consent. Cookies allow us to ensure that you enjoy the best browsing experience.

This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

Patients are slow to report hearing loss

A third of patients with hearing loss take more than two years to approach their GP about the problem, putting them at risk of long-term hearing damage, according to a survey.

The 846-patient survey, conducted by the charity Defeating Deafness, also revealed that 14 per cent of patients thought the onset of hearing loss was not important enough to bother their GP.

Some 42 per cent of patients surveyed said they would like better quality hearing aids, better access to information and hearing tests and quicker referral to specialist centres.

The National Institute for Clinical Excellence estimated there were 8.7 million people in the UK with some degree of hearing impairment and some 10 per cent of the adult population would benefit from a hearing aid.

But Vivienne Michael, chief executive of Defeating Deafness, said patients were either unwilling to use them or did not access them because their hearing loss remained undetected. She added: 'The fact that many people are reluctant to consult their GPs and suffer in silence for longer than necessary indicates that hearing loss is still regarded as a taboo subject.'

Rate this article 

Click to rate

  • 1 star out of 5
  • 2 stars out of 5
  • 3 stars out of 5
  • 4 stars out of 5
  • 5 stars out of 5

0 out of 5 stars

Have your say